Short-term effects of two integrated, non-pharmacological body weight reduction programs on coronary heart disease risk factors in young obese patients

Alessandro Sartorio, C. L. Lafortuna, P. G. Marinone, A. Tavani, C. La Vecchia, C. Bosetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In order to evaluate the short-term effects (3 weeks) on selected coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, 90 obese in-patients (body mass index, BMI, ≥35 kg/m2 received a same low-calorie diet (1200-1800 kcal/day), nutritional education and psychological counselling, and were randomly assigned to either a non-specific, high-volume, low-intensity exercise training program (NET), or to an individualised, low-volume and high-intensity exercise training program (IET), for 5 days/week for 3 weeks. NET and IET programs lead to a significant reduction in blood glucose (6.2 and 7.7% respectively), total cholesterol (17.3%, 12.3%), HDL-cholesterol (13.7%, 15.2%), systolic (8.9%, 5.3%) and diastolic resting blood pressure (10.6%, 3.3%). Total CHD scores were also significantly improved (38.1%, 33.1%). The changes occurred with a relatively moderate decrease in body weight (4.2%, 4.4%) and with still elevated BMI values (41.6 kg/m2). Although IET, compared to NET program, induced smaller reductions of blood pressure, it requires 30% daily training period and may possibly enhance long-term patient compliance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)262-265
Number of pages4
JournalDiabetes, Nutrition and Metabolism - Clinical and Experimental
Volume16
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2003

Keywords

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Diet
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity
  • Risk factors
  • Weight reduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

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