Short-term modifications in the distal gut microbiota of weaning mice induced by a high-fat diet

Vania Patrone, Susanna Ferrari, Michela Lizier, Franco Lucchini, Andrea Minuti, Barbara Tondelli, Erminio Trevisi, Filippo Rossi, Maria Luisa Callegari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The gut microbiota has been shown to be involved in host energy homeostasis and diet-induced metabolic disorders. To gain insight into the relationships among diet, microbiota and the host, we evaluated the effects of a high-fat (HF) diet on the gut bacterial community in weaning mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a control diet or a diet enriched with soy oil for 1 and 2 weeks. Administration of the HF diet caused an increase in plasma total cholesterol levels, while no significant differences in body weight gain were observed between the two diets. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles indicated considerable variations in the caecal microbial communities of mice on the HF diet, as compared with controls. Two DGGE bands with reduced intensities in HF-fed mice were identified as representing Lactobacillus gasseri and an uncultured Bacteroides species, whereas a band of increased intensity was identified as representing a Clostridium populeti-related species upon sequencing. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed a statistically significant 1-log decrease in L. gasseri cell numbers after HF feeding, and revealed a significantly lower level of Bifidobacterium spp. in the control groups after 1 and 2 weeks compared with that in the HF groups. These alterations of intestinal microbiota were not associated with caecum inflammation, as assessed by histological analysis. The observed shifts of specific bacterial populations within the gut may represent an early consequence of increased dietary fat.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)983-992
Number of pages10
JournalMicrobiology
Volume158
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

High Fat Diet
Weaning
Diet
Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis
Fats
Bacteroides
Bifidobacterium
Clostridium
Dietary Fats
Microbiota
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Weight Gain
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Oils
Homeostasis
Cell Count
Cholesterol
Body Weight
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology

Cite this

Patrone, V., Ferrari, S., Lizier, M., Lucchini, F., Minuti, A., Tondelli, B., ... Callegari, M. L. (2012). Short-term modifications in the distal gut microbiota of weaning mice induced by a high-fat diet. Microbiology, 158(4), 983-992. https://doi.org/10.1099/mic.0.054247-0

Short-term modifications in the distal gut microbiota of weaning mice induced by a high-fat diet. / Patrone, Vania; Ferrari, Susanna; Lizier, Michela; Lucchini, Franco; Minuti, Andrea; Tondelli, Barbara; Trevisi, Erminio; Rossi, Filippo; Callegari, Maria Luisa.

In: Microbiology, Vol. 158, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 983-992.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patrone, V, Ferrari, S, Lizier, M, Lucchini, F, Minuti, A, Tondelli, B, Trevisi, E, Rossi, F & Callegari, ML 2012, 'Short-term modifications in the distal gut microbiota of weaning mice induced by a high-fat diet', Microbiology, vol. 158, no. 4, pp. 983-992. https://doi.org/10.1099/mic.0.054247-0
Patrone, Vania ; Ferrari, Susanna ; Lizier, Michela ; Lucchini, Franco ; Minuti, Andrea ; Tondelli, Barbara ; Trevisi, Erminio ; Rossi, Filippo ; Callegari, Maria Luisa. / Short-term modifications in the distal gut microbiota of weaning mice induced by a high-fat diet. In: Microbiology. 2012 ; Vol. 158, No. 4. pp. 983-992.
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