Short-term oxygen administration restores blunted baroreflex sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes

L. Bernardi, M. Rosengård-Bärlund, A. Sandelin, V. P. Mäkinen, C. Forsblom, P. H. Groop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims/hypothesis: We hypothesised that the blunted baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) typical of type 1 diabetes is caused by a higher degree of tissue hypoxia in diabetes, and tested whether oxygen increased BRS and ventilation less, equally or more than in healthy control participants (the latter suggesting higher tissue hypoxia). In addition, we also considered the possible interference between oxygen and breathing pattern.Methods: In 96 participants with type 1 diabetes and 40 age-matched healthy controls, we measured BRS (average of six different standard methods), oxygen saturation, end-tidal carbon dioxide and ventilation changes during spontaneous and controlled breathing at 15 and six breaths/min, in normoxia and during 5 l/min oxygen administration. Results: BRS was blunted and blood pressure higher in diabetic participants during spontaneous breathing (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2164-2173
Number of pages10
JournalDiabetologia
Volume54
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Autonomic neuropathy
  • Baroreflex sensitivity
  • Diabetic retinopathy
  • Heart rate variability
  • Hypoxia
  • Oxygen
  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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    Bernardi, L., Rosengård-Bärlund, M., Sandelin, A., Mäkinen, V. P., Forsblom, C., & Groop, P. H. (2011). Short-term oxygen administration restores blunted baroreflex sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. Diabetologia, 54(8), 2164-2173. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-011-2195-4