"short term surgical complications after subthalamic deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Does old age matter?" Neurology, stroke and cognition

Vincenzo Levi, Giorgio Carrabba, Paolo Rampini, Marco Locatelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Patients aged 65 years and older are not traditionally considered optimal candidates for subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), mainly for their presumed increased incidence of surgical complications. The aim of this study was to assess STN-DBS surgery safety in relation to age. Methods: A total of 107 consecutive patients undergoing bilateral STN-DBS at our institution between 2002 and 2014 were retrospectively stratified according to age in two groups (Young group <65 years old; Elderly group ≥ 65 years old;). Rate of short-term surgical complications (within 90 days) was reviewed and compared between the two groups. Results: Pre-operative baseline data were comparable between the two groups. The 90-days post-operative mortality rate was 0%. Overall incidence of complications related to surgery was 6,54%. In the Elderly group we observed 3 post-operative intra-cerebral haematomas (7,89%), 1 requiring urgent surgical evacuation. In the Young group we observed 2 post-operative asymptomatic intra-cerebral haematomas (2,89%) and 2 wound infections (2,89%), 1 requiring system removal. No others surgical complications were noticed in both groups. Conclusions: Chronological age ≥ 65 years old should not be considered alone as exclusion criteria to STN-DBS surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Article number116
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 6 2015

Keywords

  • Age
  • Complications
  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Parkinson's disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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