Single fibre motor evoked potentials to brain, spinal roots and nerve stimulation. Comparisons of the 'central' and 'peripheral' response jitter to magnetic and electric stimuli

F. Zarola, M. D. Caramia, C. Paradiso, R. Mariorenzi, G. Martino, R. Traversa, P. M. Rossini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Single fibre motor evoked potentials to magnetic and electric non-invasive stimulation of brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve were recorded in 8 healthy volunteers. The 'central motor jitter' and the 'peripheral motor jitter' were respectively calculated and a comparison between the magnetic and electric modalities was made. The highest degree of latency variability was observed for both magnetic and electric central motor jitter, whilst the peripheral motor jitter to nerve stimulation was as low as the neuromuscular one (range 16-60 μs). The magnetic 'central motor jitter' (range 94-1024 μs) was much larger than the electric one (range 55-280 μs), which was in the order of jitter calculated on H-reflex studies; moreover, the former was organized in a bi- or trimodal distribution. On the contrary, no significant differences were observed between the two modalities when the jitter to nerve stimulation was taken into account. Possible contributions of corticocortical circuitries containing several synaptic interruptions during magnetic as opposed to electric transcranial stimulatio, is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-224
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Research
Volume495
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 28 1989

Keywords

  • Evoked potential
  • Jitter
  • Motoneuron
  • Motor tract
  • Motor unit
  • Stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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