Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome/Veno-Occlusive Disease after Autologous or Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children: A Retrospective Study of the Italian Hematology-Oncology Association-Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Group

Maura Faraci, A Bertaina, R Luksch, E Calore, E Lanino, F Saglio, A Prete, M C Menconi, G De Simone, V Tintori, S Cesaro, S Santarone, M G Orofino, F Locatelli, M Zecca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), also known as veno-occlusive disease (VOD), is a potentially life-threatening complication that may develop after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aims of this retrospective multicenter study were to evaluate the incidence of SOS/VOD in a large cohort of children transplanted in centers across Italy by applying the new European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) criteria and to analyze the risk factors underlying this complication. We retrospectively reviewed data of pediatric HSCTs performed in 13 AIEOP (Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica)-affiliated centers between January 2000 and April 2016. The new pediatric EBMT criteria were retrospectively applied for diagnoses of SOS/VOD and severity grading. Among 5072 transplants considered at risk for SOS/VOD during the study period, 103 children (2%) developed SOS/VOD, and the grade was severe or very severe in all patients. The median time of SOS/VOD occurrence was 17 days after HSCT (range, 1 to 104). Sixty-nine patients (67%) were treated with defibrotide for a median time of 16 days (range, 4 to 104). In multivariable analysis age < 2 years, use of busulfan during the conditioning regimen, female gender, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis were risk factors statistically associated with the development of SOS/VOD. The overall mortality directly related to SOS/VOD was 15.5%. Overall survival at 1 year was worse in patients with SOS/VOD (P = .0033), and this difference disappeared 5 years after HSCT. Nonrelapse mortality was significantly higher 1 and 5 years after transplantation in patients who developed SOS/VOD (P < .001). Based on the application of new EBMT criteria, the overall incidence of SOS/VOD recorded in this large Italian pediatric retrospective study was 2%. Nonrelapse mortality was significantly higher in patients who developed SOS/VOD. Identifying the risk factors associated with SOS/VOD can lead to more effective early treatment strategies of this potentially fatal HSCT complication in childhood.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Sep 26 2018

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