Sirtuins and resveratrol-derived compounds: A model for understanding the beneficial effects of the mediterranean diet

Matteo A. Russo, Luigi Sansone, Lucia Polletta, Alessandra Runci, Mohammad M. Rashid, Elena De Santis, Enza Vernucci, Ilaria Carnevale, Marco Tafani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet (MD) had been first observed about 50 years ago. Consumption of fresh vegetables and fruits, cereals, red wine, nuts, legumes, etc. has been regarded as the primary factor for protection from many human pathologies by the Mediterranean diet. Subsequently, this was attributed to the presence of polyphenols and their derivatives that, by exerting an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effect, can be involved in the prevention of many diseases. Clinical trials, observational studies and meta-analysis have demonstrated an antiageing effect of MD accompanied by a reduced risk of age-related pathologies, such as cardiovascular, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as cancer. The scientific explanation of such beneficial effects was limited to the reduction of the oxidative stress by compounds present in the MD. However, recently, this view is changing thanks to new studies aimed to uncover the molecular mechanism(s) activated by components of this diet. In particular, a new class of proteins called sirtuins have gained the attention of the scientific community because of their antiageing effects, their ability to protect from cardiovascular, metabolic, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and to extend lifespan in lower organisms as well as in mammals. Interestingly, resveratrol a polyphenol present in grapes, nuts and berries has been shown to activate sirtuins and such activation is able to explain most of the beneficial effects of the MD. In this review, we will highlight the importance of MD with particular attention to the possible molecular pathways that have been shown to be influenced by it. We will describe the state of the art leading to demonstrate the important role of sirtuins as principal intracellular mediators of the beneficial effects of the MD. Finally, we will also introduce how Mediterranean diet may influence microbioma composition and stem cells function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-308
Number of pages9
JournalEndocrine, Metabolic and Immune Disorders - Drug Targets
Volume14
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Sirtuins
Mediterranean Diet
Nuts
Metabolic Diseases
Polyphenols
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Fruit
Pathology
resveratrol
Vitis
Wine
Fabaceae
Vegetables
Observational Studies
Meta-Analysis
Mammals
Neoplasms
Oxidative Stress
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Cardiovascular Diseases

Keywords

  • Mediterranean diet
  • Molecular rehabilitation
  • Resveratrol
  • Resveratrol-derived compound
  • Sirtuins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sirtuins and resveratrol-derived compounds : A model for understanding the beneficial effects of the mediterranean diet. / Russo, Matteo A.; Sansone, Luigi; Polletta, Lucia; Runci, Alessandra; Rashid, Mohammad M.; Santis, Elena De; Vernucci, Enza; Carnevale, Ilaria; Tafani, Marco.

In: Endocrine, Metabolic and Immune Disorders - Drug Targets, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 300-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Russo, Matteo A. ; Sansone, Luigi ; Polletta, Lucia ; Runci, Alessandra ; Rashid, Mohammad M. ; Santis, Elena De ; Vernucci, Enza ; Carnevale, Ilaria ; Tafani, Marco. / Sirtuins and resveratrol-derived compounds : A model for understanding the beneficial effects of the mediterranean diet. In: Endocrine, Metabolic and Immune Disorders - Drug Targets. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 300-308.
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