Sister-chromatid exchanges, chromosomal aberrations and cytotoxicity produced by topoisomerase II-targeted drugs in sensitive (A2780) and resistant (A2780-DX3) human ovarian cancer cells: Correlations with the formation of DNA double-strand breaks

Elvira Noviello, MariaGrazia Aluigi, Guido Cimoli, Elisabetta Rovini, Alessandra Mazzoni, Silvio Parodi, Fabio De Sessa, Patrizia Russo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dexorubicin, ellipticine and etoposide are antineoplastic drugs with topoisomerase II inhibitory activity. The relationship between drug-induced sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) or chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and cytotoxicity, or drug-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and cytotoxicity, or drug-induced SCEs and DSBs was investigated in human ovarian cancer cells sensitive (A2780) and resistant (A2780-DX3_to topoisomerase II inhibitors. 30-min drug treatments produced SCEs, CAs and DSBs in sensitive cells, doxorubicin being more potent than etoposide at equimolar concentrations. The same treatments of resistant (A2780-DX3) cells did not produce chromosomal damage (SCEs, CAs, DSBs) and no cytotoxicity was observed. A plot of cytotoxicity versus SCEs indicated a good correlation between these two parameters for topoisomerase II inhibitors and not for mytomicin C. The plot of DSBs versus SCEs also showed a very good correlation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-29
Number of pages9
JournalMutation Research Regular Papers
Volume311
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 1994

Keywords

  • Aberrations
  • Atypical multi-drug resistance
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Sister-chromatid exchange
  • Topoisomerase II

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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