Skin artefact compensation by double calibration in bone motion reconstruction

A. Cappello, A. Cappozzo, P. F. La Palombara, A. Leardini, A. Bertani

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Bone motion assessment by means of photogrammetric, non-invasive methods can be severely corrupted by experimental errors. The largest fraction of such errors is represented by artifacts due to the soft tissues intervening between the bone and the external markers used for data acquisition. The errors affecting the estimates of anatomical landmarks trajectories in the laboratory frame can be considerably reduced by following the CAST protocol which entails: i) a static calibration of the anatomical landmarks in a technical reference frame integral with the skin marker cluster and ii) the use of a rigid model of the cluster. This paper illustrates how a modification of the above-mentioned protocol involving: i) a double calibration of the anatomical landmarks in two different postures and ii) the use of a deformable cluster model can effectively enhance bone kinematics estimation. The mean reconstruction error on an anatomical landmark trajectory drops from over 15 mm to less than 8 mm while the average error of about 5° relative to bone orientation assessment decreases to less than 3°.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Pages499-501
Number of pages3
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - 1996
EventProceedings of the 1996 18th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Part 2 (of 5) - Amsterdam, Neth
Duration: Oct 31 1996Nov 3 1996

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1996 18th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Part 2 (of 5)
CityAmsterdam, Neth
Period10/31/9611/3/96

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

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