Sleep disturbance and fatigue in mild relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis patients on chronic immunomodulant therapy: An actigraphic study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: poor sleep is common in MS and it contributes to fatigue. The β interferons produce systemic effects which may not adapt and may induce fatigue. Objective: to verify whether subjective poor sleep and fatigue during chronic therapy correspond to reduced sleep efficiency obtained by actigraphy at home. Methods: 42 ambulatory relapsing remitting MS patients with mild disability were monitored for at least 7 nights. Habitual sleep quality and fatigue were assessed with the MOS sleep measure and the Fatigue Severity Scale. Sleep logs provided daily sleep quality assessments during actigraphy at home. Patients were grouped according to their current treatment: no therapy, glatiramer acetate, IFNβ 3 times a week, and IFNβ once a week. Results and Conclusion: sleep efficiency was reduced by an average of 5% in 2/3 of the nights following IFNβ injections compared to the other nights, and daily sleep ratings correlated with actigraphy. Patients on glatiramer acetate also showed a lower sleep efficiency than patients without therapy. Actigraphy data were only modestly correlated with MOSsm scores, not with fatigue. Long term adaptation of sleep effects of immunomodulant agents is incomplete and needs to be considered in treatment planning and assessment of sleep in MS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-247
Number of pages10
JournalMultiple Sclerosis Journal
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Chronic therapy
  • Fatigue
  • Glatiramer acetate
  • Interferon β
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Side effects
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

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