EPIFISIOLISI DELLA TESTA FEMORALE IN CORSO DI TERAPIA CON ORMONE BIOSINTETICO DELLA CRESCITA. DESCRIZIONE DI UN CASO CLINICO

Translated title of the contribution: Slipped capital femoral epiphysis and biosyntetic growth hormone therapy. A case report

L. Mazzarello, L. Franchi, R. Gastaldi, F. M. Senes, G. Asquasciati, T. De Toni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The case of an adolescent male with short stature and partial growth hormone deficiency who developed a slipped capital femoral epiphysis during the treatment with recombinant growth hormone is reported in this paper. Our patient started GH therapy with recombinant growth hormone at the dose of 15 U/m2/week administered subcutaneously three times a week. After 6 months of GH therapy there was a satisfactory response to the therapy and his growth velocity improved significantly. Unfortunately the patient had pain of the left hip which was exacerbated by walking. The diagnosis of slipped capital femoral epiphysis was confirmed radiographically and treated surgically with internal fixation of the epiphysis with the use of Moore's pins. Treatment with GH was discontinued. After one year there was the complete risolution of the disease and the adolescent was able to return at his usual way of life. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a disease in which the anatomic relationship between the femoral head and neck changes by disruption of the epiphyseal plate. This condition can occur only before the epiphyseal plate closes. Patients vary in age from newborn infant to teenager, nevertheless slipped capital femoral epiphysis is probably the most common hip disease during adolescence, and is often associated with endocrine imbalance including growth hormone deficiency. The aetiology of slipped capital femoral epiphysis is still unknown although many theories have been proposed. It is well documented that the highest incidence is during the adolescent growth spurt and this correlation can be explained with changes in epiphyseal plate secondary to the influence of growth hormone, Somatomedin-C and sex steroid which are involved in adolescent growth spurt. It was demonstrated that these hormones contribute to the widening of the weakest zone of the epiphyseal plate and thus could increase the risk of slipped capital femoral epiphysis in GH-deficient children treated with GH therapy. The case we reported may be an additional contributing factor in the development of slipped capital femoral epiphysis. We suggest that children with milder forms of GH deficiency or other forms of idiopathic short stature treated with GH may be at increased risk for slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Further study would be needed to confirm the clinical significance of this observation.

Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)109-112
Number of pages4
JournalMinerva Pediatrica
Volume46
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphyses
Growth Hormone
Growth Plate
Therapeutics
Hip
Growth
Epiphyses
Femur Neck
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Walking
Steroids
Newborn Infant
Hormones
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

EPIFISIOLISI DELLA TESTA FEMORALE IN CORSO DI TERAPIA CON ORMONE BIOSINTETICO DELLA CRESCITA. DESCRIZIONE DI UN CASO CLINICO. / Mazzarello, L.; Franchi, L.; Gastaldi, R.; Senes, F. M.; Asquasciati, G.; De Toni, T.

In: Minerva Pediatrica, Vol. 46, No. 3, 1994, p. 109-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mazzarello, L, Franchi, L, Gastaldi, R, Senes, FM, Asquasciati, G & De Toni, T 1994, 'EPIFISIOLISI DELLA TESTA FEMORALE IN CORSO DI TERAPIA CON ORMONE BIOSINTETICO DELLA CRESCITA. DESCRIZIONE DI UN CASO CLINICO', Minerva Pediatrica, vol. 46, no. 3, pp. 109-112.
Mazzarello, L. ; Franchi, L. ; Gastaldi, R. ; Senes, F. M. ; Asquasciati, G. ; De Toni, T. / EPIFISIOLISI DELLA TESTA FEMORALE IN CORSO DI TERAPIA CON ORMONE BIOSINTETICO DELLA CRESCITA. DESCRIZIONE DI UN CASO CLINICO. In: Minerva Pediatrica. 1994 ; Vol. 46, No. 3. pp. 109-112.
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