Small-for-gestational-age infants need dietary quality more than quantity for their development

The role of human milk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infants born small for gestational age (SGA) show some forms of developmental delay throughout paediatric age, and up to adolescence. The positive effect of breastfeeding on development, observed in most studies on healthy, term infants, seems to be further stressed in the group of SGA infants, particularly if breastfeeding is protracted. Besides the close maternal-infant contact of breastfeeding, the nutritional factors of human milk, above all long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid, may at least partly account for the observed association. Conclusion: SGA infants represent a high-risk group, not only for developmental delay, but also for long-term, unfavourable metabolic consequences. Breastfeeding and human milk quality together could help to prevent some of the neurological and metabolic sequelae of being born growth retarded.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)827-829
Number of pages3
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume94
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2005

Fingerprint

Small for Gestational Age Infant
Human Milk
Breast Feeding
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Mothers
Pediatrics
Growth

Keywords

  • Breastfeeding
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Human milk
  • Neurodevelopment
  • Small-for-gestational-age infants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Infants born small for gestational age (SGA) show some forms of developmental delay throughout paediatric age, and up to adolescence. The positive effect of breastfeeding on development, observed in most studies on healthy, term infants, seems to be further stressed in the group of SGA infants, particularly if breastfeeding is protracted. Besides the close maternal-infant contact of breastfeeding, the nutritional factors of human milk, above all long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid, may at least partly account for the observed association. Conclusion: SGA infants represent a high-risk group, not only for developmental delay, but also for long-term, unfavourable metabolic consequences. Breastfeeding and human milk quality together could help to prevent some of the neurological and metabolic sequelae of being born growth retarded.",
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