Smoking high tar cigarettes increases risk of death from lung cancer, but no differences in risk for smokers of very low, low and medium tar cigarettes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Question. What is the relationship between lung cancer mortality and tar rating of smoker's cigarette brand? Study Design. Multivariate analysis of data from prospective cohort study. Main results. Risk of death due to lung cancer was significantly higher in smokers of high-tar cigarettes compared with people smoking low, very low and medium tar cigarettes (see Table 1). There were no significant differences in the risk of lung cancer mortality for people smoking very low or low tar cigarettes compared with smokers of medium tar cigarettes. Stopping smoking considerably reduced risk of lung cancer. People quitting before age 35 years had a very similar risk to those who had never smoked. A table is presented. Authors' conclusions. There was no detectable difference in risk of lung cancer among people who smoked very low, low or medium tar cigarettes. An increased risk was identified in people who smoked high tar cigarettes. These findings persisted after adjustment for demographics, diet and medical history and for cigarettes/day.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-209
Number of pages3
JournalEvidence-Based Healthcare
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2004

Keywords

  • Cohort study
  • Lung cancer
  • Risk factors
  • Smoking
  • Yields

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Smoking high tar cigarettes increases risk of death from lung cancer, but no differences in risk for smokers of very low, low and medium tar cigarettes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this