Social relationship coping efficacy

A new construct in understanding social support and close personal relationships in persons with cancer

Thomas V Merluzzi, Samantha Serpentini, Errol J Philip, Miao Yang, Natalia Salamanca-Balen, Carolyn A Heitzmann Ruhf, Antonio Catarinella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Social relationship coping efficacy (SRCE) is the confidence to engage in behaviors that can maintain or enhance close social relationships in the context of illness. This study focused on psychometric analyses of the SRCE scale and its role in maintaining or enhancing personal relationships, social support, and quality of life (QOL).

METHOD: A mixed diagnosis sample (N = 151) of cancer patients completed a variety of measures: physical debilitation, received emotional and instrumental support, SRCE, and QOL.

RESULTS: The SRCE scale is a 10-item, one-factor, internally reliable (α = 0.965) measure with strong concurrent validity in relation to measures of social support. SRCE fully mediated the relationship between physical debilitation and both instrumental and emotional received support. SRCE also was directly related to both social/family well-being and psychological distress, and this relationship was also partially mediated by social support.

CONCLUSIONS: The results corroborated that SRCE might account for changes in both instrumental and emotional support. Also, the direct and indirect relationship (mediated by social support) of SRCE with both social/family well-being and distress indicated that interventions to increase SRCE with those at risk for social support loss may bolster social support in personal relationships as well as enhance emotional well-being and quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-91
Number of pages7
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume28
Issue number1
Early online dateOct 30 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

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Social Support
Neoplasms
Quality of Life
Psychometrics
Psychology

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Social relationship coping efficacy : A new construct in understanding social support and close personal relationships in persons with cancer. / Merluzzi, Thomas V; Serpentini, Samantha; Philip, Errol J; Yang, Miao; Salamanca-Balen, Natalia; Heitzmann Ruhf, Carolyn A; Catarinella, Antonio.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.2019, p. 85-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Merluzzi, Thomas V ; Serpentini, Samantha ; Philip, Errol J ; Yang, Miao ; Salamanca-Balen, Natalia ; Heitzmann Ruhf, Carolyn A ; Catarinella, Antonio. / Social relationship coping efficacy : A new construct in understanding social support and close personal relationships in persons with cancer. In: Psycho-Oncology. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 85-91.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Social relationship coping efficacy (SRCE) is the confidence to engage in behaviors that can maintain or enhance close social relationships in the context of illness. This study focused on psychometric analyses of the SRCE scale and its role in maintaining or enhancing personal relationships, social support, and quality of life (QOL).METHOD: A mixed diagnosis sample (N = 151) of cancer patients completed a variety of measures: physical debilitation, received emotional and instrumental support, SRCE, and QOL.RESULTS: The SRCE scale is a 10-item, one-factor, internally reliable (α = 0.965) measure with strong concurrent validity in relation to measures of social support. SRCE fully mediated the relationship between physical debilitation and both instrumental and emotional received support. SRCE also was directly related to both social/family well-being and psychological distress, and this relationship was also partially mediated by social support.CONCLUSIONS: The results corroborated that SRCE might account for changes in both instrumental and emotional support. Also, the direct and indirect relationship (mediated by social support) of SRCE with both social/family well-being and distress indicated that interventions to increase SRCE with those at risk for social support loss may bolster social support in personal relationships as well as enhance emotional well-being and quality of life.",
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AU - Yang, Miao

AU - Salamanca-Balen, Natalia

AU - Heitzmann Ruhf, Carolyn A

AU - Catarinella, Antonio

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