Soft artificial tactile sensors for the measurement of human-robot interaction in the rehabilitation of the lower limb

S. M M De Rossi, N. Vitiello, T. Lenzi, R. Ronsse, B. Koopman, A. Persichetti, F. Giovacchini, F. Vecchi, A. J. Ijspeert, H. Van Der Kooij, M. C. Carrozza

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A new and alternative method to measure the interaction force between the user and a lower-limb gait rehabilitation exoskeleton is presented. Instead of using a load cell to measure the resulting interaction force, we propose a distributed measure of the normal interaction pressure over the whole contact area between the user and the machine. To obtain this measurement, a soft silicone tactile sensor is inserted between the limb and commonly used connection cuffs. The advantage of this approach is that it allows for a distributed measure of the interaction pressure, which could be useful for rehabilitation therapy assessment purposes, or for control. Moreover, the proposed solution does not change the comfort of the interaction; can be applied to connection cuffs of different shapes and sizes; and can be manufactured at a low cost. Preliminary results during gait assistance tasks show that this approach can precisely detect changes in the pressure distribution during a gait cycle.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2010 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC'10
Pages1279-1282
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event2010 32nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC'10 - Buenos Aires, Argentina
Duration: Aug 31 2010Sep 4 2010

Other

Other2010 32nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC'10
CountryArgentina
CityBuenos Aires
Period8/31/109/4/10

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

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