Soluble CD30, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and TNF receptors in primary HIV-1 infection: Relationship with HIV-1 RNA, clinical outcome and early antiviral therapy

G. P. Rizzardi, G. Tambussi, W. Barcellini, B. Capiluppi, E. Clerici, L. La Maestra, F. Lillo, G. Pantaleo, A. Lazzarin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The natural course of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) infection varies considerably. The identification of laboratory disease markers has become critically important to patient management. This study, carried out on 37 patients with primary HIV-1 infection (PHI), shows that, along with plasma HIV-1 RNA and CD4+ T cell counts, evaluation of plasma levels of some immune activation markers (sCD30, TNF-α, and sTNFR-I) may help to identify patients at risk of a more rapid disease progression, suggesting that immune activation is among the factors who determine the rate of disease progression. Early combination antiviral therapy significantly decreased levels of virus load and of immune activation markers, suggesting that it may reduce the extent of immune activation through the suppression of HIV-1 replication. Among others, sCD30 could be a more sensitive marker of immune activation, and it might be also useful in the monitoring of the response to antiviral therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-49
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents
Volume11
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1997

Keywords

  • Antiviral therapy
  • HIV-1 RNA
  • Primary HIV-1 infection
  • Soluble CD30
  • Soluble TNF receptors
  • TNF-α

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Physiology
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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