Sonographic depiction of trigger fingers in acromegaly

Alberto Tagliafico, Eugenia Resmini, Marnix T. Van Holsbeeck, Lorenzo E. Derchi, Diego Ferone, Carlo Martinoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of trigger fingers in patients with acromegaly versus an unaffected control group. Methods. This study was performed with Institutional Review Board approval, and informed written consent was obtained from each patient and control participant. The diagnosis was made by a combination of clinical symptoms and sonographically measured thickening of the first annular (A1) pulley. The A1 pulley thickness was measured in 40 patients and 40 control participants by means of a 17 - 5 MHz high-resolution transducer. Thickening of the A1 pulley and abnormalities of the underlying flexor tendons associated with the clinical sign were diagnostic for a trigger finger. The acromegalic patients were divided into groups according to disease activity and therapy. The study was performed at the baseline and at a follow-up after 1 year. Results. At the baseline, clinical and sonographic findings were consistent with trigger fingers in 25% of patients (6 at presentation and 4 with uncontrolled disease). After 1 year, the trigger fingers recovered in the patients who were not receiving any treatment at the beginning of the study. In patients with uncontrolled disease, the condition remained unchanged. The A1 pulley thickness was greater in the acromegalic patients than control participants (mean ± SD, 0.44 ± 0.19 versus 0.24 ± 0.05 mm; P <.05). In the patients treated for acromegaly, the trigger fingers disappeared, and a reduction in the A1 pulley thickness was noted (P <.05) at the follow-up. Conclusions. Trigger fingers were observed in 25% of the acromegalic patients but in none of the control participants. The A1 pulley was significantly thicker in the acromegalic patients and normalized after 1 year in some who were treated for the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1441-1446
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Ultrasound in Medicine
Volume28
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2009

Fingerprint

Acromegaly
Fingers
Research Ethics Committees
Informed Consent
Transducers
Tendons

Keywords

  • Acromegaly
  • Pulley
  • Sonography
  • Trigger finger

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Tagliafico, A., Resmini, E., Van Holsbeeck, M. T., Derchi, L. E., Ferone, D., & Martinoli, C. (2009). Sonographic depiction of trigger fingers in acromegaly. Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, 28(11), 1441-1446.

Sonographic depiction of trigger fingers in acromegaly. / Tagliafico, Alberto; Resmini, Eugenia; Van Holsbeeck, Marnix T.; Derchi, Lorenzo E.; Ferone, Diego; Martinoli, Carlo.

In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 11, 01.11.2009, p. 1441-1446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tagliafico, A, Resmini, E, Van Holsbeeck, MT, Derchi, LE, Ferone, D & Martinoli, C 2009, 'Sonographic depiction of trigger fingers in acromegaly', Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, vol. 28, no. 11, pp. 1441-1446.
Tagliafico A, Resmini E, Van Holsbeeck MT, Derchi LE, Ferone D, Martinoli C. Sonographic depiction of trigger fingers in acromegaly. Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. 2009 Nov 1;28(11):1441-1446.
Tagliafico, Alberto ; Resmini, Eugenia ; Van Holsbeeck, Marnix T. ; Derchi, Lorenzo E. ; Ferone, Diego ; Martinoli, Carlo. / Sonographic depiction of trigger fingers in acromegaly. In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 28, No. 11. pp. 1441-1446.
@article{a872e819ea0646e79cb3d96839c48505,
title = "Sonographic depiction of trigger fingers in acromegaly",
abstract = "Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of trigger fingers in patients with acromegaly versus an unaffected control group. Methods. This study was performed with Institutional Review Board approval, and informed written consent was obtained from each patient and control participant. The diagnosis was made by a combination of clinical symptoms and sonographically measured thickening of the first annular (A1) pulley. The A1 pulley thickness was measured in 40 patients and 40 control participants by means of a 17 - 5 MHz high-resolution transducer. Thickening of the A1 pulley and abnormalities of the underlying flexor tendons associated with the clinical sign were diagnostic for a trigger finger. The acromegalic patients were divided into groups according to disease activity and therapy. The study was performed at the baseline and at a follow-up after 1 year. Results. At the baseline, clinical and sonographic findings were consistent with trigger fingers in 25{\%} of patients (6 at presentation and 4 with uncontrolled disease). After 1 year, the trigger fingers recovered in the patients who were not receiving any treatment at the beginning of the study. In patients with uncontrolled disease, the condition remained unchanged. The A1 pulley thickness was greater in the acromegalic patients than control participants (mean ± SD, 0.44 ± 0.19 versus 0.24 ± 0.05 mm; P <.05). In the patients treated for acromegaly, the trigger fingers disappeared, and a reduction in the A1 pulley thickness was noted (P <.05) at the follow-up. Conclusions. Trigger fingers were observed in 25{\%} of the acromegalic patients but in none of the control participants. The A1 pulley was significantly thicker in the acromegalic patients and normalized after 1 year in some who were treated for the disease.",
keywords = "Acromegaly, Pulley, Sonography, Trigger finger",
author = "Alberto Tagliafico and Eugenia Resmini and {Van Holsbeeck}, {Marnix T.} and Derchi, {Lorenzo E.} and Diego Ferone and Carlo Martinoli",
year = "2009",
month = "11",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "1441--1446",
journal = "Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine",
issn = "0278-4297",
publisher = "American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sonographic depiction of trigger fingers in acromegaly

AU - Tagliafico, Alberto

AU - Resmini, Eugenia

AU - Van Holsbeeck, Marnix T.

AU - Derchi, Lorenzo E.

AU - Ferone, Diego

AU - Martinoli, Carlo

PY - 2009/11/1

Y1 - 2009/11/1

N2 - Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of trigger fingers in patients with acromegaly versus an unaffected control group. Methods. This study was performed with Institutional Review Board approval, and informed written consent was obtained from each patient and control participant. The diagnosis was made by a combination of clinical symptoms and sonographically measured thickening of the first annular (A1) pulley. The A1 pulley thickness was measured in 40 patients and 40 control participants by means of a 17 - 5 MHz high-resolution transducer. Thickening of the A1 pulley and abnormalities of the underlying flexor tendons associated with the clinical sign were diagnostic for a trigger finger. The acromegalic patients were divided into groups according to disease activity and therapy. The study was performed at the baseline and at a follow-up after 1 year. Results. At the baseline, clinical and sonographic findings were consistent with trigger fingers in 25% of patients (6 at presentation and 4 with uncontrolled disease). After 1 year, the trigger fingers recovered in the patients who were not receiving any treatment at the beginning of the study. In patients with uncontrolled disease, the condition remained unchanged. The A1 pulley thickness was greater in the acromegalic patients than control participants (mean ± SD, 0.44 ± 0.19 versus 0.24 ± 0.05 mm; P <.05). In the patients treated for acromegaly, the trigger fingers disappeared, and a reduction in the A1 pulley thickness was noted (P <.05) at the follow-up. Conclusions. Trigger fingers were observed in 25% of the acromegalic patients but in none of the control participants. The A1 pulley was significantly thicker in the acromegalic patients and normalized after 1 year in some who were treated for the disease.

AB - Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of trigger fingers in patients with acromegaly versus an unaffected control group. Methods. This study was performed with Institutional Review Board approval, and informed written consent was obtained from each patient and control participant. The diagnosis was made by a combination of clinical symptoms and sonographically measured thickening of the first annular (A1) pulley. The A1 pulley thickness was measured in 40 patients and 40 control participants by means of a 17 - 5 MHz high-resolution transducer. Thickening of the A1 pulley and abnormalities of the underlying flexor tendons associated with the clinical sign were diagnostic for a trigger finger. The acromegalic patients were divided into groups according to disease activity and therapy. The study was performed at the baseline and at a follow-up after 1 year. Results. At the baseline, clinical and sonographic findings were consistent with trigger fingers in 25% of patients (6 at presentation and 4 with uncontrolled disease). After 1 year, the trigger fingers recovered in the patients who were not receiving any treatment at the beginning of the study. In patients with uncontrolled disease, the condition remained unchanged. The A1 pulley thickness was greater in the acromegalic patients than control participants (mean ± SD, 0.44 ± 0.19 versus 0.24 ± 0.05 mm; P <.05). In the patients treated for acromegaly, the trigger fingers disappeared, and a reduction in the A1 pulley thickness was noted (P <.05) at the follow-up. Conclusions. Trigger fingers were observed in 25% of the acromegalic patients but in none of the control participants. The A1 pulley was significantly thicker in the acromegalic patients and normalized after 1 year in some who were treated for the disease.

KW - Acromegaly

KW - Pulley

KW - Sonography

KW - Trigger finger

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=73949156482&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=73949156482&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 1441

EP - 1446

JO - Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine

JF - Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine

SN - 0278-4297

IS - 11

ER -