SOX2 silencing in glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells causes stop of proliferation and loss of tumorigenicity

Rosaria Maria Rita Gangemi, Fabrizio Griffero, Daniela Marubbi, Marzia Perera, Maria Cristina Capra, Paolo Malatesta, Gian Luigi Ravetti, Gian Luigi Zona, Antonio Daga, Giorgio Corte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Glioblastoma, the most aggressive cerebral tumor, is invariably lethal. Glioblastoma cells express several genes typical of normal neural stem cells. One of them, SOX2, is a master gene involved in sustaining self-renewal of several stem cells, in particular neural stem cells. To investigate its role in the aberrant growth of glioblastoma, we silenced SOX2 in freshly derived glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Our results indicate that SOX2 silenced glioblastoma TICs, despite the many mutations they have accumulated, stop proliferating and lose tumorigenicity in immunodeficient mice. SOX2 is then also fundamental for maintenance of the self-renewal capacity of neural stem cells when they have acquired cancer properties. SOX2, or its immediate downstream effectors, would then be an ideal target for glioblastoma therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-48
Number of pages9
JournalStem Cells
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Keywords

  • Glioblastoma
  • SOX2 gene silencing
  • Tumor-initiating cells
  • Tumorigenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Medicine

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