Spatiotopic coding and remapping in humans

David C. Burr, Maria Concetta Morrone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How our perceptual experience of the world remains stable and continuous in the face of continuous rapid eye movements still remains a mystery. This review discusses some recent progress towards understanding the neural and psychophysical processes that accompany these eye movements. We firstly report recent evidence from imaging studies in humans showing that many brain regions are tuned in spatiotopic coordinates, but only for items that are actively attended. We then describe a series of experiments measuring the spatial and temporal phenomena that occur around the time of saccades, and discuss how these could be related to visual stability. Finally, we introduce the concept of the spatio-temporal receptive field to describe the local spatiotopicity exhibited by many neurons when the eyes move. This journal is

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)504-515
Number of pages12
JournalPhilosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological sciences
Volume366
Issue number1564
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 27 2011

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Eye movements
eyes
Saccades
REM Sleep
Eye Movements
Neurons
brain
Brain
neurons
image analysis
Imaging techniques
experiment
Experiments

Keywords

  • Eye movements
  • Remapping
  • Spatiotopicity
  • Vision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Spatiotopic coding and remapping in humans. / Burr, David C.; Morrone, Maria Concetta.

In: Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological sciences, Vol. 366, No. 1564, 27.02.2011, p. 504-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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