Specific HIV-1 integrase polymorphisms change their prevalence in untreated versus antiretroviral-treated HIV-1-infected patients, all naive to integrase inhibitors

Francesca Ceccherini-Silberstein, Isabelle Malet, Lavinia Fabeni, Salvatore Dimonte, Valentina Svicher, Roberta D'Arrigo, Anna Artese, Giosuè Costa, Sara Bono, Stefano Alcaro, Antonella d'Arminio Monforte, Christine Katlama, Vincent Calvez, Andrea Antinori, Anne Genevieve Marcelin, Carlo Federico Perno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To define whether the prevalence of mutations associated with integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance is different in untreated versus antiretroviral-treated HIV-1-infected individuals (all INI naive). Methods: Gene sequences of the integrase (IN) and reverse transcriptase (RT) obtained from plasma samples of a well-defined cohort of 448 HIV-1-infected individuals (134 drug naive and 314 antiretroviral treated) were analysed. Docking simulations, using RT and IN models, were also performed. Results: Primary mutations and the majority of secondary mutations for raltegravir or elvitegravir were completely absent (or rarely found,

Original languageEnglish
Article numberdkq326
Pages (from-to)2305-2318
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Volume65
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 3 2010

Keywords

  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • Co-evolution
  • HIV drug resistance
  • Integrase
  • Molecular docking
  • Polymorphisms
  • Reverse transcriptase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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