Spectral karyotyping combined with locus-specific FISH simultaneously defines genes and chromosomes involved in chromosomal translocations

Giovanni Tonon, Anna Roschke, Kristen Stover, Yaping Shou, W. Michael Kuehl, Ilan R. Kirsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Genes that play roles in malignant transformation have often been found proximate to cancer-associated chromosomal breakpoints. Identifying genes that flank chromosomal reconfigurations is thus essential for cancer cytogenetics. To simplify and expedite this identification, we have developed a novel approach, based on simultaneous spectral karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) which, in a single step, can identify gross chromosomal aberrations as well as detect the involvement of specific loci in these rearrangements. Signals for specifically queried genes (FISH probe) were easily detectable in metaphase cells, together with the signals from painted chromosomes (spectral karyotyping probes). The concentration and size of the FISH probes could cover a wide range and still be used successfully. Some of the nucleotide-bound dyes used for the labeling, as Cy3, Spectrum Orange, Alexa 594, Texas Red, and Rhodamine 110, were particularly efficient. More than one gene can be queried in the same metaphase, because multiple FISH probes could be hybridized simultaneously. To demonstrate this technique, we applied it to the myeloma cell line Karpas 620, which has numerous chromosomal rearrangements. The approach that we present here will be particularly useful for the analysis of complex karyotypes and for testing hypotheses arising from cancer gene expression studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)418-423
Number of pages6
JournalGenes Chromosomes and Cancer
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics

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