Spike timing regulation on the millisecond scale by distributed synaptic plasticity at the cerebellum input stage: A simulation study

Jesús A. Garrido, Eduardo Ros, Egidio D'Angelo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The way long-term synaptic plasticity regulates neuronal spike patterns is not completely understood. This issue is especially relevant for the cerebellum, which is endowed with several forms of long-term synaptic plasticity and has been predicted to operate as a timing and a learning machine. Here we have used a computational model to simulate the impact of multiple distributed synaptic weights in the cerebellar granular layer network. In response to mossy fiber bursts, synaptic weights at multiple connections played a crucial role to regulate spike number and positioning in granule cells. The weight at mossy fiber to granule cell synapses regulated the delay of the first spike and the weight at mossy fiber and parallel fiber to Golgi cell synapses regulated the duration of the time-window during which the first-spike could be emitted. Moreover, the weights of synapses controlling Golgi cell activation regulated the intensity of granule cell inhibition and therefore the number of spikes that could be emitted. First spike timing was regulated with millisecond precision and the number of spikes ranged from 0 to 3. Interestingly, different combinations of synaptic weights optimized either first-spike timing precision or spike number, efficiently controlling transmission and filtering properties. These results predict that distributed synaptic plasticity regulates the emission of quasi-digital spike patterns on the millisecond time scale and allows the cerebellar granular layer to flexibly control burst transmission along the mossy fiber pathway.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFrontiers in Computational Neuroscience
Issue numberMAY
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2 2013

Keywords

  • Cerebellum
  • Granular layer
  • LTD
  • LTP
  • Spike timing
  • Spiking network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Spike timing regulation on the millisecond scale by distributed synaptic plasticity at the cerebellum input stage: A simulation study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this