Spontaneous mutation of cell oncogenes plays a minor role in neoplastic transformation of virus-induced murine T-cell lymphomas

D. Gasparotto, R. Maestro, T. Vukosavljevic, S. Piccinin, A. Sandrin, S. Rizzo, M. Boiocchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mink cell focus-forming viruses (MCF) are slow-transforming retroviruses that are able to accelerate the appearance of T-cell lymphomas when injected in newborn AKR mice. Activation of proto-oncogenes by proviral insertion is thought to be the major mechanism by which these viruses exert their oncogenic potential. However, molecular phenomena not strictly virus-determined, such as mutations in cellular oncogenes/tumor suppressor genes or chromosome aberrations, have been hypothesized to contribute to the achievement of the fully neoplastic phenotype in MCF-infected mice. To evaluate the role of spontaneous mutagenesis phenomena in murine virus-induced lymphomagenesis, we analyzed a series of 18 MCF247-induced thymic lymphomas and derived cell lines for the presence of p53 and c-ras gene mutations. Only 1 mutation at the p53 gene and 1 mutation at the ki-ras gene were detected in our study. Our results suggest that spontaneous mutagenesis plays a minor role in virus-induced lymphomagenesis and support the notion that multiple proviral insertions could be the prevalent mechanism of transformation in this experimental system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-272
Number of pages5
JournalTumori
Volume81
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Fingerprint

T-Cell Lymphoma
Oncogenes
Viruses
Mutation
Mink
ras Genes
Mutagenesis
Inbred AKR Mouse
Proto-Oncogenes
p53 Genes
Retroviridae
Tumor Suppressor Genes
Chromosome Aberrations
Lymphoma
Phenotype
Cell Line

Keywords

  • c-ras
  • MCF
  • murine lymphomagenesis
  • p53

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Gasparotto, D., Maestro, R., Vukosavljevic, T., Piccinin, S., Sandrin, A., Rizzo, S., & Boiocchi, M. (1995). Spontaneous mutation of cell oncogenes plays a minor role in neoplastic transformation of virus-induced murine T-cell lymphomas. Tumori, 81(4), 268-272.

Spontaneous mutation of cell oncogenes plays a minor role in neoplastic transformation of virus-induced murine T-cell lymphomas. / Gasparotto, D.; Maestro, R.; Vukosavljevic, T.; Piccinin, S.; Sandrin, A.; Rizzo, S.; Boiocchi, M.

In: Tumori, Vol. 81, No. 4, 1995, p. 268-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gasparotto, D, Maestro, R, Vukosavljevic, T, Piccinin, S, Sandrin, A, Rizzo, S & Boiocchi, M 1995, 'Spontaneous mutation of cell oncogenes plays a minor role in neoplastic transformation of virus-induced murine T-cell lymphomas', Tumori, vol. 81, no. 4, pp. 268-272.
Gasparotto, D. ; Maestro, R. ; Vukosavljevic, T. ; Piccinin, S. ; Sandrin, A. ; Rizzo, S. ; Boiocchi, M. / Spontaneous mutation of cell oncogenes plays a minor role in neoplastic transformation of virus-induced murine T-cell lymphomas. In: Tumori. 1995 ; Vol. 81, No. 4. pp. 268-272.
@article{54ddde16f38848c1bdafbf1792650e9c,
title = "Spontaneous mutation of cell oncogenes plays a minor role in neoplastic transformation of virus-induced murine T-cell lymphomas",
abstract = "Mink cell focus-forming viruses (MCF) are slow-transforming retroviruses that are able to accelerate the appearance of T-cell lymphomas when injected in newborn AKR mice. Activation of proto-oncogenes by proviral insertion is thought to be the major mechanism by which these viruses exert their oncogenic potential. However, molecular phenomena not strictly virus-determined, such as mutations in cellular oncogenes/tumor suppressor genes or chromosome aberrations, have been hypothesized to contribute to the achievement of the fully neoplastic phenotype in MCF-infected mice. To evaluate the role of spontaneous mutagenesis phenomena in murine virus-induced lymphomagenesis, we analyzed a series of 18 MCF247-induced thymic lymphomas and derived cell lines for the presence of p53 and c-ras gene mutations. Only 1 mutation at the p53 gene and 1 mutation at the ki-ras gene were detected in our study. Our results suggest that spontaneous mutagenesis plays a minor role in virus-induced lymphomagenesis and support the notion that multiple proviral insertions could be the prevalent mechanism of transformation in this experimental system.",
keywords = "c-ras, MCF, murine lymphomagenesis, p53",
author = "D. Gasparotto and R. Maestro and T. Vukosavljevic and S. Piccinin and A. Sandrin and S. Rizzo and M. Boiocchi",
year = "1995",
language = "English",
volume = "81",
pages = "268--272",
journal = "Tumori",
issn = "0300-8916",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spontaneous mutation of cell oncogenes plays a minor role in neoplastic transformation of virus-induced murine T-cell lymphomas

AU - Gasparotto, D.

AU - Maestro, R.

AU - Vukosavljevic, T.

AU - Piccinin, S.

AU - Sandrin, A.

AU - Rizzo, S.

AU - Boiocchi, M.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Mink cell focus-forming viruses (MCF) are slow-transforming retroviruses that are able to accelerate the appearance of T-cell lymphomas when injected in newborn AKR mice. Activation of proto-oncogenes by proviral insertion is thought to be the major mechanism by which these viruses exert their oncogenic potential. However, molecular phenomena not strictly virus-determined, such as mutations in cellular oncogenes/tumor suppressor genes or chromosome aberrations, have been hypothesized to contribute to the achievement of the fully neoplastic phenotype in MCF-infected mice. To evaluate the role of spontaneous mutagenesis phenomena in murine virus-induced lymphomagenesis, we analyzed a series of 18 MCF247-induced thymic lymphomas and derived cell lines for the presence of p53 and c-ras gene mutations. Only 1 mutation at the p53 gene and 1 mutation at the ki-ras gene were detected in our study. Our results suggest that spontaneous mutagenesis plays a minor role in virus-induced lymphomagenesis and support the notion that multiple proviral insertions could be the prevalent mechanism of transformation in this experimental system.

AB - Mink cell focus-forming viruses (MCF) are slow-transforming retroviruses that are able to accelerate the appearance of T-cell lymphomas when injected in newborn AKR mice. Activation of proto-oncogenes by proviral insertion is thought to be the major mechanism by which these viruses exert their oncogenic potential. However, molecular phenomena not strictly virus-determined, such as mutations in cellular oncogenes/tumor suppressor genes or chromosome aberrations, have been hypothesized to contribute to the achievement of the fully neoplastic phenotype in MCF-infected mice. To evaluate the role of spontaneous mutagenesis phenomena in murine virus-induced lymphomagenesis, we analyzed a series of 18 MCF247-induced thymic lymphomas and derived cell lines for the presence of p53 and c-ras gene mutations. Only 1 mutation at the p53 gene and 1 mutation at the ki-ras gene were detected in our study. Our results suggest that spontaneous mutagenesis plays a minor role in virus-induced lymphomagenesis and support the notion that multiple proviral insertions could be the prevalent mechanism of transformation in this experimental system.

KW - c-ras

KW - MCF

KW - murine lymphomagenesis

KW - p53

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028868876&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028868876&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8540125

AN - SCOPUS:0028868876

VL - 81

SP - 268

EP - 272

JO - Tumori

JF - Tumori

SN - 0300-8916

IS - 4

ER -