Standard and viscoelastic mechanical properties of respiratory system compartments in dogs: Effect of volume, posture, and shape

Edgardo D'Angelo, Edoardo Calderini, Mario Tavola, Matteo Pecchiari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In 9 anesthetized, paralyzed dogs lung and chest-wall standard (viscous resistance, Rint, and quasi-static elastance, Est) and viscoelastic parameters (resistance, Rvel, and time constant, τvel) were measured in the supine posture before and after rib-cage block, after application of an expiratory threshold load, and after 75° head-up tilting before and after wide chest opening. Lung and chest-wall τvel were the same under all conditions. Rvel was independent of volume and posture, and greater for the lung. Chest-wall Rint was independent of flow, volume, and posture. Lung Rint decreased with increasing volume. Chest-wall Rint, Est and Rvel increased with rib-cage block, allowing the assessment of both abdominal-wall and rib-cage characteristics. When chest opening did not elicit bronchoconstriction, the decrease of Rvel was ∼6%. Main conclusions: lung and chest-wall exhibit linear tissue viscoelasticity within the range studied; rib-cage and abdomen characteristics are similar, and asynchronous motion is not expected at physiological respiratory rates; in normal lungs, heterogeneity of parallel time constants plays a marginal role.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-39
Number of pages9
JournalRespiratory Physiology and Neurobiology
Volume261
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2019

Keywords

  • Abdominal wall
  • Airway resistance
  • Chest wall
  • Lung
  • Mechanics
  • Rib cage
  • Viscoelasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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