Status Epilepticus Secondary to Pseudonodular Hemorragic Occipital Lesion with Edema: "Non Semper Ea Sunt, Quae Videntur, Decipit Frons Prima Multos" (Things Are Not Always What They Seem; The First Appearance Deceives Many)

Davide Nasi, Franco Servadei, Antonio Romano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We report a case in which common radiologic images masked a rare case of supratentorial hemangioblastoma (HBL). Other peculiarities of this case are the clinical presentation with status epilepticus and the occurrence of a supratentorial HBL unrelated to von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. Based on clinical and radiologic findings, including massive cerebral edema and hemorrhagic presentation, our preoperative diagnosis was a cerebral metastasis. In this scenario, physicians must take into account the words of the Roman fabulist Phaedrus: "Non semper ea sunt, quae videntur, decipit frons prima multos" (things are not always what they seem; the first appearance deceives many).

Original languageEnglish
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Mar 26 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hemangioblastoma
Status Epilepticus
Edema
von Hippel-Lindau Disease
Brain Edema
Neoplasm Metastasis
Physicians

Keywords

  • Hemangioblastoma
  • Status epilepticus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Status Epilepticus Secondary to Pseudonodular Hemorragic Occipital Lesion with Edema: {"}Non Semper Ea Sunt, Quae Videntur, Decipit Frons Prima Multos{"} (Things Are Not Always What They Seem; The First Appearance Deceives Many)",
abstract = "We report a case in which common radiologic images masked a rare case of supratentorial hemangioblastoma (HBL). Other peculiarities of this case are the clinical presentation with status epilepticus and the occurrence of a supratentorial HBL unrelated to von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. Based on clinical and radiologic findings, including massive cerebral edema and hemorrhagic presentation, our preoperative diagnosis was a cerebral metastasis. In this scenario, physicians must take into account the words of the Roman fabulist Phaedrus: {"}Non semper ea sunt, quae videntur, decipit frons prima multos{"} (things are not always what they seem; the first appearance deceives many).",
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T2 - "Non Semper Ea Sunt, Quae Videntur, Decipit Frons Prima Multos" (Things Are Not Always What They Seem; The First Appearance Deceives Many)

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AU - Servadei, Franco

AU - Romano, Antonio

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N2 - We report a case in which common radiologic images masked a rare case of supratentorial hemangioblastoma (HBL). Other peculiarities of this case are the clinical presentation with status epilepticus and the occurrence of a supratentorial HBL unrelated to von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. Based on clinical and radiologic findings, including massive cerebral edema and hemorrhagic presentation, our preoperative diagnosis was a cerebral metastasis. In this scenario, physicians must take into account the words of the Roman fabulist Phaedrus: "Non semper ea sunt, quae videntur, decipit frons prima multos" (things are not always what they seem; the first appearance deceives many).

AB - We report a case in which common radiologic images masked a rare case of supratentorial hemangioblastoma (HBL). Other peculiarities of this case are the clinical presentation with status epilepticus and the occurrence of a supratentorial HBL unrelated to von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. Based on clinical and radiologic findings, including massive cerebral edema and hemorrhagic presentation, our preoperative diagnosis was a cerebral metastasis. In this scenario, physicians must take into account the words of the Roman fabulist Phaedrus: "Non semper ea sunt, quae videntur, decipit frons prima multos" (things are not always what they seem; the first appearance deceives many).

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