Status of surgical margins and prognosis in adult soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities: A series of patients treated at a single institution

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Abstract

Purpose: To explore the prognostic effect of microscopic marginal status after surgery for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 911 consecutive patients surgically treated throughout a 20-year span at a single referral center. Six hundred forty-two were first seen with a primary tumor, and 269, with a locally recurrent tumor. All patients underwent macroscopically complete resection. Microscopic marginal status was negative (tumor size > 1 mm) in 748 patients and positive (≤ 1 mm) in 163 patients. Median follow-up was 107 months. Results: Patients with primary disease had a lower disease-specific mortality in comparison to those first examined for recurrence (25% v 37%, respectively, at 10 years). Size, malignancy grade, depth, histotype, and local recurrence had a statistically significant prognostic effect at multivariable analysis, while microscopically positive surgical margins had not, though a trend in favor of negative margins was observed. However, an extra risk was observed for patients with positive margins after 3 to 5 years (hazard ratio, 1.8 after 5 years v 0.8 before 5 years). In patients treated for a local recurrence, the prognostic impact of positive margins was higher (hazard ratio, 1.6). Conclusion: Positive surgical margins had a weak adverse prognostic effect, which was more pronounced for those patients escaping an early relapse. This would seem to justify a policy of surgical adequacy in adult soft tissue sarcomas, though clinical decision making in borderline presentations for conservative surgery might be reasonably flexible and shared with the patient. Once a local relapse has occurred, the impact of local treatments seems more critical.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-104
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2005

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Sarcoma
Extremities
Recurrence
Neoplasms
Margins of Excision
Referral and Consultation
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

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title = "Status of surgical margins and prognosis in adult soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities: A series of patients treated at a single institution",
abstract = "Purpose: To explore the prognostic effect of microscopic marginal status after surgery for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 911 consecutive patients surgically treated throughout a 20-year span at a single referral center. Six hundred forty-two were first seen with a primary tumor, and 269, with a locally recurrent tumor. All patients underwent macroscopically complete resection. Microscopic marginal status was negative (tumor size > 1 mm) in 748 patients and positive (≤ 1 mm) in 163 patients. Median follow-up was 107 months. Results: Patients with primary disease had a lower disease-specific mortality in comparison to those first examined for recurrence (25{\%} v 37{\%}, respectively, at 10 years). Size, malignancy grade, depth, histotype, and local recurrence had a statistically significant prognostic effect at multivariable analysis, while microscopically positive surgical margins had not, though a trend in favor of negative margins was observed. However, an extra risk was observed for patients with positive margins after 3 to 5 years (hazard ratio, 1.8 after 5 years v 0.8 before 5 years). In patients treated for a local recurrence, the prognostic impact of positive margins was higher (hazard ratio, 1.6). Conclusion: Positive surgical margins had a weak adverse prognostic effect, which was more pronounced for those patients escaping an early relapse. This would seem to justify a policy of surgical adequacy in adult soft tissue sarcomas, though clinical decision making in borderline presentations for conservative surgery might be reasonably flexible and shared with the patient. Once a local relapse has occurred, the impact of local treatments seems more critical.",
author = "Alessandro Gronchi and Casali, {P. G.} and L. Mariani and R. Miceli and M. Fiore and {Lo Vullo}, S. and R. Bertulli and P. Collini and L. Lozza and P. Olmi and J. Rosai",
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T1 - Status of surgical margins and prognosis in adult soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities

T2 - A series of patients treated at a single institution

AU - Gronchi, Alessandro

AU - Casali, P. G.

AU - Mariani, L.

AU - Miceli, R.

AU - Fiore, M.

AU - Lo Vullo, S.

AU - Bertulli, R.

AU - Collini, P.

AU - Lozza, L.

AU - Olmi, P.

AU - Rosai, J.

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Purpose: To explore the prognostic effect of microscopic marginal status after surgery for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 911 consecutive patients surgically treated throughout a 20-year span at a single referral center. Six hundred forty-two were first seen with a primary tumor, and 269, with a locally recurrent tumor. All patients underwent macroscopically complete resection. Microscopic marginal status was negative (tumor size > 1 mm) in 748 patients and positive (≤ 1 mm) in 163 patients. Median follow-up was 107 months. Results: Patients with primary disease had a lower disease-specific mortality in comparison to those first examined for recurrence (25% v 37%, respectively, at 10 years). Size, malignancy grade, depth, histotype, and local recurrence had a statistically significant prognostic effect at multivariable analysis, while microscopically positive surgical margins had not, though a trend in favor of negative margins was observed. However, an extra risk was observed for patients with positive margins after 3 to 5 years (hazard ratio, 1.8 after 5 years v 0.8 before 5 years). In patients treated for a local recurrence, the prognostic impact of positive margins was higher (hazard ratio, 1.6). Conclusion: Positive surgical margins had a weak adverse prognostic effect, which was more pronounced for those patients escaping an early relapse. This would seem to justify a policy of surgical adequacy in adult soft tissue sarcomas, though clinical decision making in borderline presentations for conservative surgery might be reasonably flexible and shared with the patient. Once a local relapse has occurred, the impact of local treatments seems more critical.

AB - Purpose: To explore the prognostic effect of microscopic marginal status after surgery for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 911 consecutive patients surgically treated throughout a 20-year span at a single referral center. Six hundred forty-two were first seen with a primary tumor, and 269, with a locally recurrent tumor. All patients underwent macroscopically complete resection. Microscopic marginal status was negative (tumor size > 1 mm) in 748 patients and positive (≤ 1 mm) in 163 patients. Median follow-up was 107 months. Results: Patients with primary disease had a lower disease-specific mortality in comparison to those first examined for recurrence (25% v 37%, respectively, at 10 years). Size, malignancy grade, depth, histotype, and local recurrence had a statistically significant prognostic effect at multivariable analysis, while microscopically positive surgical margins had not, though a trend in favor of negative margins was observed. However, an extra risk was observed for patients with positive margins after 3 to 5 years (hazard ratio, 1.8 after 5 years v 0.8 before 5 years). In patients treated for a local recurrence, the prognostic impact of positive margins was higher (hazard ratio, 1.6). Conclusion: Positive surgical margins had a weak adverse prognostic effect, which was more pronounced for those patients escaping an early relapse. This would seem to justify a policy of surgical adequacy in adult soft tissue sarcomas, though clinical decision making in borderline presentations for conservative surgery might be reasonably flexible and shared with the patient. Once a local relapse has occurred, the impact of local treatments seems more critical.

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