Abstract

Recent work has focused on cell transplantation as a therapeutic option following ischemic stroke, based on animal studies showing that cells transplanted to the brain not only survive, but also lead to functional improvement. Neural degeneration after ischemia is not selective but involves different neuronal populations, as well as glial and endothelial cell types. In models of stroke, the principal mechanism by which any improvement has been observed, has been attributed to the release of trophic factors, possibly promoting endogenous repair mechanisms, reducing cell death and stimulating neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Initial human studies indicate that stem cell therapy may be technically feasible in stroke patients, however, issues still need to be addressed for use in human subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-772
Number of pages16
JournalCellular and Molecular Life Sciences
Volume66
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

Fingerprint

Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Stem Cells
Stroke
Cell Transplantation
Neurogenesis
Neuroglia
Cell Death
Ischemia
Endothelial Cells
Brain
Population
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Preclinical and clinical studies
  • Stem cell therapy
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Stem cell therapy in stroke. / Locatelli, F.; Bersano, A.; Ballabio, E.; Lanfranconi, S.; Papadimitriou, D.; Strazzer, S.; Bresolin, N.; Comi, G. P.; Corti, S.

In: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, Vol. 66, No. 5, 03.2009, p. 757-772.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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