Stiff person syndrome does not always occur with maternal passive transfer of GAD65 antibodies

Raffaello Nemni, L. M. Caniatti, M. Gironi, E. Bazzigaluppi, D. De Grandis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors report the presence of high titer antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD65) until age 24 months in two asymptomatic newborns of a woman with stiff-person syndrome (SPS). No signs of SPS were detectable in the two children at ages 6 and 8 years. This observation indicates that other cofactors are involved in the pathogenesis of SPS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2101-2102
Number of pages2
JournalNeurology
Volume62
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - Jun 8 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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  • Cite this

    Nemni, R., Caniatti, L. M., Gironi, M., Bazzigaluppi, E., & De Grandis, D. (2004). Stiff person syndrome does not always occur with maternal passive transfer of GAD65 antibodies. Neurology, 62(11), 2101-2102.