Stress as an intercellular signal

the emergence of stress-associated molecular patterns (SAMP).

Anna Rubartelli, Roberto Sitia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstrct Cells are continuously exposed to stressful situations that generally entail generation of reactive oxygen species and other redox alterations. Low levels of stress are physiological and can transmit essential survival or adaptive signals. At higher levels, however, the responses become maladaptive and cause damage. Frequently, stressful events occurring in a few cells propagate, resulting in tissue or even systemic response. Here we review recent evidence suggesting that stressed cells signal their state by expressing on their surface and secreting suitable molecular clues, which we propose to term Stress-Associated Molecular Patterns (SAMP). A unifying mechanism seems to involve the release of oxidoreductases and redox modifiers into the intercellular space, with structural and functional alterations in key signaling molecules. These observations open the way to novel therapeutic strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2621-2629
Number of pages9
JournalAntioxidants and Redox Signaling
Volume11
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

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Oxidation-Reduction
Reactive Oxygen Species
Oxidoreductases
Extracellular Space
Tissue
Molecules
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Stress as an intercellular signal : the emergence of stress-associated molecular patterns (SAMP). / Rubartelli, Anna; Sitia, Roberto.

In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, Vol. 11, No. 10, 10.2009, p. 2621-2629.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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