Structural and functional brain signatures of C9orf72 in motor neuron disease

Federica Agosta, Pilar M. Ferraro, Nilo Riva, Edoardo Gioele Spinelli, Teuta Domi, Paola Carrera, Massimiliano Copetti, Yuri Falzone, Maurizio Ferrari, Christian Lunetta, Giancarlo Comi, Andrea Falini, Angelo Quattrini, Massimo Filippi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) motor neuron disease (MND) relative to disease severity-matched sporadic MND cases. We enrolled 19 C9orf72 and 67 disease severity-matched sporadic MND patients, and 22 controls. Sporadic cases were grouped in patients with: no cognitive/behavioral deficits (sporadic-motor); same patterns of cognitive/behavioral impairment as C9orf72 cases (sporadic-cognitive); shorter disease duration versus other sporadic groups (sporadic-early). C9orf72 patients showed cerebellar and thalamic atrophy versus all sporadic cases. All MND patients showed motor, frontal, and temporoparietal cortical thinning and motor and extramotor white matter damage versus controls, independent of genotype and presence of cognitive impairment. Compared with sporadic-early, C9orf72 patients revealed an occipital cortical thinning. C9orf72 patients had enhanced visual network functional connectivity versus sporadic-motor and sporadic-early cases. Structural cerebellar and thalamic damage and posterior cortical alterations are the brain magnetic resonance imaging signatures of C9orf72 MND. Frontotemporal cortical and widespread white matter involvement are likely to be an effect of the disease evolution rather than a C9orf72 marker.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)206-219
Number of pages14
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume57
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2017

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Keywords

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • C9orf72
  • Cognitive deficits
  • Cortical thickness
  • Functional connectivity
  • White matter damage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Ageing
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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