Studies on intragastric PCO2 at rest and during exercise as a marker of intestinal perfusion in patients with chronic heart failure

Andreas Krack, Barbara M. Richartz, Anja Gastmann, Kasia Greim, Ulrich Lotze, Stefan D. Anker, Hans R. Figulla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate mesenteric ischaemia by determining intragastric PCO2 (iPCO2) with gastric tonometry during rest and exercise stress testing in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). In CHF inflammatory immune activation is hypothesized to result from a chronic endotoxin challenge due to bacterial translocation of hypoperfused intestinal mucosa. Methods and Results: In 10 patients with CHF and ten healthy controls a tonometry catheter was inserted into the stomach. IPCO2 was measured at rest and during bicycle exercise every 5 min. At rest arterial pCO2 (aPCO2), intragastric pCO 2 (iPCO2) and the intragastric/arterial gap did not differ between patients and controls. During low level exercise (25 W), patients showed an increase in iPCO2 compared to resting iPCO2, whereas controls did not show an increase in iPCO2 (change in iPCO2: 12±2% vs. 1±0.4%, P2 during peak exercise was 25±3% higher than at rest, compared to controls (increase 2±1, P2. This is likely to reflect hypoperfusion of the intestinal mucosa, which may contribute to the development of bacterial translocation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)403-407
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Heart Failure
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

Keywords

  • Bacterial translocation
  • CHF, chronic heart failure
  • Chronic heart failure
  • Intestinal perfusion
  • NYHA, New York Heart Association
  • PCO, partial pressure of carbondioxide
  • PO , partial pressure of oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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