Study of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in a population of HIV-negative migrants and HIV-infected patients attending an outpatient clinic in Rome.

A. Oliva, M. Lichtner, M. T. Mascellino, M. Iannetta, A. M. Ialungo, S. Tadadjeu Mewamba, P. Pavone, F. Mengoni, C. M. Mastroianni, V. Vullo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Migration and HIV infection are known risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage and infection. The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of MRSA nasal colonization in a high risk population of HIV-negative migrants and HIV-infected subjects. Secondary aim was to investigate over time MRSA carriage prevalence in HIV-infected subjects. During the study period (January-June 2008), nasal swabs were collected from 96 HIV-negative migrants and 63 HIV-infected patients. A group of 68 seropositive subjects was additionally screened for MRSA carriage in 2012. Subjects were evaluated for HIV status, previous antibiotic use or hospitalization, soft tissue and skin infections (SSI), nationality and work conditions. The swab specimens were plated and incubated for 24-h under static condition at 37 degrees and then identified as S. aureus by using standard methods. A total of 227 subjects, 131 HIV-infected adults (63 in 2008 and 68 in 2012) and 96 HIV-negative migrants, were analyzed. Overall, 71/227 (31.2%) were S. aureus carriers: 34 out of 131 (25.9%) among HIV infected subjects and 37 out of 96 (38.5%) among migrants. Two MRSA were detected in HIV-infected patients (2.8%). Between 2008 and 2012 there was an increase of MRSA carriage in HIV+ group (p=0.49). No statistically significant differences were found between S. aureus carriers and no-carriers in terms of CD4+ cell count, TMP/SMX prophylaxis, previous antibiotic use or hospitalization, nationality and duration of stay in Italy. Among HIV+ patients there was a higher prevalence of SSI in MSSA carriers compared with no carriers (25% vs 4%, p=0.028). In the migrants group, having a job based on a close human contact was significantly associated with S. aureus colonization (p=0.0038). Despite of the high prevalence of S. aureus isolation (31.2%), the present study showed the low rate of MRSA carriage in a high risk population. The main factor associated with S. aureus colonization was a close human contact rather than the HIV status and the condition of being migrant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-107
Number of pages9
JournalAnnali di igiene : medicina preventiva e di comunità
Volume25
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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