Subspecialty second-opinion in multiple myeloma ct: Emphasis on clinically significant lytic lesions

Alberto Stefano Tagliafico, Liliana Belgioia, Alessandro Bonsignore, Federica Rossi, Giulia Succio, Bianca Bignotti, Alida Dominietto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and objectives: In order to increase the accuracy of lytic lesion detection in multiple myeloma, a dedicated second-opinion interpretation of medical images performed by subspecialty musculoskeletal radiologists could increase accuracy. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the added value (increased accuracy) of subspecialty second-opinion (SSO) consultations for Computed Tomography (CT) examinations in Multiple Myeloma (MM) patients undergoing stem cell transplantation on standard computed tomography with a focus on focal lesion detection. Materials and Methods: Approval from the institutional review board was obtained. This retrospective study included 70 MM consecutive patients (mean age, 62 years ± 11.3 (standard deviation); range, 35–88 years) admitted in the last six years. Pre-transplant total-body CT (reported by general radiologists) was the only inclusion criteria. Each of these CT examinations had a second-opinion interpretation by two experienced subspecialty musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists (13 years of experience and 6 years of experience, mean: 9.5 years), experts in musculoskeletal radiology and bone image interpretation with a focus on lytic lesions. Results: Per lesion intra-and inter-observer agreement between the two radiologists was calculated with K statistics and the results were good (K = 0.67: Confidence Inteval (CI) 95%: 0.61–0.78). When the initial CT reports were compared with the re-interpretation reports, 46 (65%) of the 70 cases (95% CI: 37–75%) had no discrepancy. There was a discrepancy in detecting a clinically unimportant abnormality in 10/70 (14%) patients (95% CI: 7–25%) unlikely to alter patient care or irrelevant to further clinical management. A discrepancy in interpreting a clinically important abnormality was registered in 14/70 (21%) patients for focal lesions. The mean diameter of focal lesions was: 23 mm (95% CI: 5–57 mm). The mean number of focal lesions per patient was 3.4 (95% CI). Conclusions: subspecialty second-opinion consultations in multiple myeloma CT is more accurate to identify lesions, especially lytic lesions, amenable to influence patients’ care.

Original languageEnglish
Article number195
JournalMedicina (Lithuania)
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2020

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Computed tomography
  • Lytic lesions
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Second-look
  • Staging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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