Substrate reduction therapy with Miglustat in pediatric patients with GM1 type 2 gangliosidosis delays neurological involvement: A multicenter experience

Rita Fischetto, Valentina Palladino, Maria M Mancardi, Thea Giacomini, Stefano Palladino, Alberto Gaeta, Maja Di Rocco, Lucia Zampini, Giuseppe Lassandro, Vito Favia, Maria E Tripaldi, Pietro Strisciuglio, Alfonso Romano, Mariasavina Severino, Amelia Morrone, Paola Giordano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In GM1 gangliosidosis the lack of function of β-galactosidase results in an accumulation of GM1 ganglioside and related glycoconjugates in visceral organs, and particularly in the central nervous system, leading to severe disability and premature death. In the type 2 form of the disease, early intervention would be important to avoid precocious complications. To date, there are no effective therapeutic options in preventing progressive neurological deterioration. Substrate reduction therapy with Miglustat, a N-alkylated sugar that inhibits the enzyme glucosylceramide synthase, has been proposed for the treatment of several lysosomal storage disorders such as Gaucher type 1 and Niemann Pick Type C diseases. However, data on Miglustat therapy in patients with GM1 gangliosidosis are still scarce.

METHODS: We report here the results of Miglustat administration in four Italian children (average age: 55 months, range 20-125) affected by GM1 gangliosidosis type 2 treated in three different Italian pediatric hospitals specialized in metabolic diseases.

CONCLUSION: This treatment was safe and relatively well tolerated by all patients, with stabilization and/or slowing down of the neurological progression in three subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e1371
JournalMolecular genetics & genomic medicine
Volume8
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

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