Sucrosomial iron supplementation in anemic patients with celiac disease not tolerating oral ferrous sulfate: A prospective study

Luca Elli, Francesca Ferretti, Federica Branchi, Carolina Tomba, Vincenza Lombardo, Alice Scricciolo, Luisa Doneda, Leda Roncoroni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients with celiac disease (CD) frequently suffer from iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and may benefit from iron supplementation. However, intolerance to iron sulfate and duodenal atrophy could reduce the efficacy of this supplementation. This study evaluated the efficacy of a new sucrosomial iron formulation in patients with CD. Consecutive patients with CD and IDA were divided into two groups: patients with a known intolerance to iron sulfate were treated with sucrosomial iron (30 mg of iron/day), while those receiving iron supplementation for the first time were assigned to iron sulfate (105 mg of iron/day). Forty-three patients were enrolled (38 females, mean age 49 ± 9 years). After a follow-up of 90 days both groups showed an increase in Hb levels compared to baseline (+10.1% and +16.2% for sucrosomial and sulfate groups, respectively), and a significant improvement in all iron parameters, with no statistical difference between the two groups. Patients treated with sucrosomial iron reported a lower severity of abdominal symptoms, such as abdominal and epigastric pain, abdominal bloating, and constipation, and a higher increase in general well-being (+33% vs. +21%) compared to the iron sulfate group. Sucrosomial iron can be effective in providing iron supplementation in difficult-to-treat populations, such as patients with CD, IDA, and known intolerance to iron sulfate.

Original languageEnglish
Article number330
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 9 2018

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ferrous sulfate
celiac disease
Celiac Disease
prospective studies
mouth
Iron
Prospective Studies
iron
Sulfates
sulfates
iron deficiency anemia
Iron-Deficiency Anemias

Keywords

  • Celiac disease
  • Iron deficiency anemia
  • Iron sulfate
  • Sucrosomial iron

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Sucrosomial iron supplementation in anemic patients with celiac disease not tolerating oral ferrous sulfate : A prospective study. / Elli, Luca; Ferretti, Francesca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Lombardo, Vincenza; Scricciolo, Alice; Doneda, Luisa; Roncoroni, Leda.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 10, No. 3, 330, 09.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elli, Luca ; Ferretti, Francesca ; Branchi, Federica ; Tomba, Carolina ; Lombardo, Vincenza ; Scricciolo, Alice ; Doneda, Luisa ; Roncoroni, Leda. / Sucrosomial iron supplementation in anemic patients with celiac disease not tolerating oral ferrous sulfate : A prospective study. In: Nutrients. 2018 ; Vol. 10, No. 3.
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