Sugars, exercise and health

R Codella, I Terruzzi, L Luzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is a direct link between a variety of addictions and mood states to which exercise could be relieving. Sugar addiction has been recently counted as another binge/compulsive/addictive eating behavior, differently induced, leading to a high-significant health problem. Regularly exercising at moderate intensity has been shown to efficiently and positively impact upon physiological imbalances caused by several morbid conditions, including affective disorders. Even in a wider set of physchiatric diseases, physical exercise has been prescribed as a complementary therapeutic strategy. Method: A comprehensive literature search was carried out in the Cochrane Library and MEDLINE databases (search terms: sugar addiction, food craving, exercise therapy, training, physical fitness, physical activity, rehabilitation and aerobic). Results: Seeking high-sugar diets, also in a reward- or craving-addiction fashion, can generate drastic metabolic derangements, often interpolated with affective disorders, for which exercise may represent a valuable, universal, non-pharmachological barrier. Limitations: More research in humans is needed to confirm potential exercise-mechanisms that may break the bond between sugar over-consumption and affective disorders. Conclusions: The purpose of this review is to address the importance of physical exercise in reversing the gloomy scenario of unhealthy diets and sedentary lifestyles in our modern society. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-86
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume224
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Mood Disorders
Exercise
Health
Addictive Behavior
Diet
Sedentary Lifestyle
Exercise Therapy
Physical Fitness
Feeding Behavior
Reward
MEDLINE
Libraries
Rehabilitation
Databases
Food
Research
Craving
Therapeutics

Cite this

Sugars, exercise and health. / Codella, R; Terruzzi, I; Luzi, L.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 224, No. 7, 2017, p. 76-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Codella, R ; Terruzzi, I ; Luzi, L. / Sugars, exercise and health. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2017 ; Vol. 224, No. 7. pp. 76-86.
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