Suggestive evidence of a multi-cytokine resistin pathway in humans and its role on cardiovascular events in high-risk individuals

Claudia Menzaghi, Antonella Marucci, Alessandra Antonucci, Concetta De Bonis, Lorena Ortega Moreno, Lucia Salvemini, Massimiliano Copetti, Vincenzo Trischitta, Rosa Di Paola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In cells and tissues resistin affects IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and TNF-α expression, thus suggesting the existence of a multi-cytokine "resistin pathway". We investigated whether such pathway does exist in humans and, if so, if it is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Serum cytokines were measured in 280 healthy subjects from the Gargano Study 2 (GS2) whose BMI, waist circumference, HOMA IR, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure data were available and in 353 patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease from the Gargano Heart Study (GHS)-prospective design (follow-up 5.4 ± 2.5 years; 71 MACE). In GS2, cytokines mRNA levels in white blood cells were also measured. In GS2, resistin mRNA was correlated with all cytokines expression (all p < 0.001), but IL-12B. Consistently, serum resistin was correlated with all serum cytokines (all p < 0.001), but IL-12. Expression (eRPS) and serum (sRPS) resistin pathway scores (excluding IL-12) were each other correlated (p < 0.001) and both associated with cardiovascular risk factors (all p < 0.01). In GHS, sRPS was independently associated with MACE (HR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.10-1.90). Our data indicate the existence of a resistin pathway, which is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and which strongly and independently predicts MACE.

Original languageEnglish
Article number44337
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 14 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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