Suicidal ideation, perceived disability, hopelessness and affective temperaments in patients affected by Parkinson's disease

Isabella Berardelli, Daniele Belvisi, Valentina Corigliano, Matteo Costanzo, Marco Innamorati, Giovanni Fabbrini, Alfredo Berardelli, Maurizio Pompili

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Previous studies investigating the risk of suicide in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have reported conflicting results. This study evaluated suicide risk in PD and investigated the relationship between suicide risk and perceived disability, hopelessness and affective temperaments in PD. Methods: One-hundred and twenty PD patients were consecutively enrolled. The diagnosis of PD was based on clinical criteria. All patients underwent a psychiatric evaluation that included the administration of the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, the Italian Perceived Disability Scale, the Beck Hopelessness Inventory and the TEMPS-A questionnaire. The results were compared with those of a control group of 91 patients affected by another chronic disease, ie, open angle glaucoma. Results: Parkinson's disease patients had higher suicidal ideation, higher perceived disability and lower hyperthymia than the control group. In PD, higher perceived disability was associated with higher current and lifetime suicidal ideation, lower hyperthymia, older age and higher scores on negative temperaments. Suicidal ideation, negative temperaments and hopelessness were risk factors for perceived disability, while hyperthymia was a protective factor for perceived disability. Discussion: Patients with PD have an increased risk of suicidal ideation. Increased suicidal ideation in PD is associated with the increased perceived disability. A psychiatric assessment that includes the investigation of suicide risk and perceived disability is recommended in patients with PD.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13287
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Practice
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Suicidal Ideation
Temperament
Parkinson Disease
Suicide
Psychiatry
Control Groups
Open Angle Glaucoma
Chronic Disease
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Suicidal ideation, perceived disability, hopelessness and affective temperaments in patients affected by Parkinson's disease",
abstract = "Background: Previous studies investigating the risk of suicide in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have reported conflicting results. This study evaluated suicide risk in PD and investigated the relationship between suicide risk and perceived disability, hopelessness and affective temperaments in PD. Methods: One-hundred and twenty PD patients were consecutively enrolled. The diagnosis of PD was based on clinical criteria. All patients underwent a psychiatric evaluation that included the administration of the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, the Italian Perceived Disability Scale, the Beck Hopelessness Inventory and the TEMPS-A questionnaire. The results were compared with those of a control group of 91 patients affected by another chronic disease, ie, open angle glaucoma. Results: Parkinson's disease patients had higher suicidal ideation, higher perceived disability and lower hyperthymia than the control group. In PD, higher perceived disability was associated with higher current and lifetime suicidal ideation, lower hyperthymia, older age and higher scores on negative temperaments. Suicidal ideation, negative temperaments and hopelessness were risk factors for perceived disability, while hyperthymia was a protective factor for perceived disability. Discussion: Patients with PD have an increased risk of suicidal ideation. Increased suicidal ideation in PD is associated with the increased perceived disability. A psychiatric assessment that includes the investigation of suicide risk and perceived disability is recommended in patients with PD.",
author = "Isabella Berardelli and Daniele Belvisi and Valentina Corigliano and Matteo Costanzo and Marco Innamorati and Giovanni Fabbrini and Alfredo Berardelli and Maurizio Pompili",
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T1 - Suicidal ideation, perceived disability, hopelessness and affective temperaments in patients affected by Parkinson's disease

AU - Berardelli, Isabella

AU - Belvisi, Daniele

AU - Corigliano, Valentina

AU - Costanzo, Matteo

AU - Innamorati, Marco

AU - Fabbrini, Giovanni

AU - Berardelli, Alfredo

AU - Pompili, Maurizio

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: Previous studies investigating the risk of suicide in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have reported conflicting results. This study evaluated suicide risk in PD and investigated the relationship between suicide risk and perceived disability, hopelessness and affective temperaments in PD. Methods: One-hundred and twenty PD patients were consecutively enrolled. The diagnosis of PD was based on clinical criteria. All patients underwent a psychiatric evaluation that included the administration of the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, the Italian Perceived Disability Scale, the Beck Hopelessness Inventory and the TEMPS-A questionnaire. The results were compared with those of a control group of 91 patients affected by another chronic disease, ie, open angle glaucoma. Results: Parkinson's disease patients had higher suicidal ideation, higher perceived disability and lower hyperthymia than the control group. In PD, higher perceived disability was associated with higher current and lifetime suicidal ideation, lower hyperthymia, older age and higher scores on negative temperaments. Suicidal ideation, negative temperaments and hopelessness were risk factors for perceived disability, while hyperthymia was a protective factor for perceived disability. Discussion: Patients with PD have an increased risk of suicidal ideation. Increased suicidal ideation in PD is associated with the increased perceived disability. A psychiatric assessment that includes the investigation of suicide risk and perceived disability is recommended in patients with PD.

AB - Background: Previous studies investigating the risk of suicide in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have reported conflicting results. This study evaluated suicide risk in PD and investigated the relationship between suicide risk and perceived disability, hopelessness and affective temperaments in PD. Methods: One-hundred and twenty PD patients were consecutively enrolled. The diagnosis of PD was based on clinical criteria. All patients underwent a psychiatric evaluation that included the administration of the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, the Italian Perceived Disability Scale, the Beck Hopelessness Inventory and the TEMPS-A questionnaire. The results were compared with those of a control group of 91 patients affected by another chronic disease, ie, open angle glaucoma. Results: Parkinson's disease patients had higher suicidal ideation, higher perceived disability and lower hyperthymia than the control group. In PD, higher perceived disability was associated with higher current and lifetime suicidal ideation, lower hyperthymia, older age and higher scores on negative temperaments. Suicidal ideation, negative temperaments and hopelessness were risk factors for perceived disability, while hyperthymia was a protective factor for perceived disability. Discussion: Patients with PD have an increased risk of suicidal ideation. Increased suicidal ideation in PD is associated with the increased perceived disability. A psychiatric assessment that includes the investigation of suicide risk and perceived disability is recommended in patients with PD.

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