Superficial neoplasia involving the Ileocecal valve: Clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection

Gianluca Andrisani, Takehide Fukuchi, Giulio Antonelli, Jun Hamanaka, Cesare Hassan, Guido Costamagna, Shin Maeda, Francesco Maria Di Matteo, Kingo Hirasawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is the treatment of choice for colorectal superficial neoplasia, but certain anatomical locations are challenging even for skilled endoscopists. Ileocecal valve (ICV) is considered a technically challenging site for ESD. Objective: Aim of this study was to analyze efficacy and safety of Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in the treatment of colorectal neoplasia involving the ileocecal valve (ICV) Design: Retrospective study. Patients: We retrospectively evaluated 1507 consecutive patients undergoing ESD at two tertiary referral centres for ESD (Italy and Japan) from January 2008 to March 2020. Main Outcome Measures: Demographic, clinical, procedural, and follow-up data was collected, analysed, and compared between patients with ileocecal valve lesions (ICVL) and patients with non-ICVL. Results: Overall, 1507 patients were enrolled (872 M, 57.8%), of these 53 patients had lesions involving the ICV. Mean age was 70.2 years (range, 53–83 years). En-bloc resection was achieved in 52 (98%) patients. The median specimen size of ICVL was 36.4 mm (range, 8–80 mm), significantly smaller than non-ICVL (p = 0.005). Procedure time was significantly longer in the ICVL group, (71.3 vs. 58.9 min; p = 0.03). Non Granular Type Laterally Spreading Tumors (LST-NG) were significantly more frequent in the ICVL group compared to rectum (52.8% vs. 25.7; p = 0.0001). En-bloc resection rate in the ileocecal region did not differ significantly between groups (p = 0.20). Complications such as perforation and postoperative occurred respectively in 3/53 (5.7%) and 1/53 (2%) patient, and were treated conservatively. At first surveillance colonoscopy performed at 6 months, recurrent adenoma was detected in 2/53 patients (3.9%). Conclusions: ESD is safe and effective for the treatment of colorectal neoplasia involving the ileocecal valve if performed by expert endoscopist in referral centres.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)889-894
Number of pages6
JournalDigestive and Liver Disease
Volume53
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • ESD
  • Ileocecal valve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

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