Supplementary and Primary Sensory Motor Area Activity in Parkinson's Disease: Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Changes During Finger Movements and Effects of Apomorphine

Olivier Rascol, Umberto Sabatini, François Chollet, Pierre Celsis, Jean Louis Montastruc, Jean Pierre Marc Vergnes, André Rascol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

199 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have measured with single-photon emission tomography the regional cerebral blood flow changes that occurred in the supplementary motor areas and in the primary sensory motor areas during sequential finger-to-thumb opposition movements of the right hand in seven akinetic patients with Parkinson's disease and in nine normal volunteers. Parkinsonian patients were studied before ("off" condition) and after a subcutaneous injection of apomorphine hydrochloride which was able to switch them "on" (on condition). In normal volunteers and parkinsonian patients in the on condition, regional cerebral blood flow significantly increased in the supplementary motor areas and in the contralateral primary sensory motor cortex but not in the ipsilateral primary sensory motor cortex. On the contrary, no significant regional cerebral blood flow change was observed in these areas in parkinsonian patients in the off condition. These results support the hypothesis that a functional cortical motor area deafferentation is involved in the pathophysiological makeup of akinesia and that this abnormality is reversed by dopaminergic drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144-148
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Apomorphine
Regional Blood Flow
Motor Cortex
Fingers
Parkinson Disease
Motor Activity
Healthy Volunteers
Dopamine Agents
Thumb
Subcutaneous Injections
Photons
Sensorimotor Cortex
Parkinson's Disease
Activity Areas
Regional Cerebral Blood Flow
Hand
Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Supplementary and Primary Sensory Motor Area Activity in Parkinson's Disease : Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Changes During Finger Movements and Effects of Apomorphine. / Rascol, Olivier; Sabatini, Umberto; Chollet, François; Celsis, Pierre; Montastruc, Jean Louis; Marc Vergnes, Jean Pierre; Rascol, André.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 49, No. 2, 1992, p. 144-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rascol, Olivier ; Sabatini, Umberto ; Chollet, François ; Celsis, Pierre ; Montastruc, Jean Louis ; Marc Vergnes, Jean Pierre ; Rascol, André. / Supplementary and Primary Sensory Motor Area Activity in Parkinson's Disease : Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Changes During Finger Movements and Effects of Apomorphine. In: Archives of Neurology. 1992 ; Vol. 49, No. 2. pp. 144-148.
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