Supplementation with vitamin E alone is associated with reduced myocardial infarction: A meta-analysis

L. Loffredo, L. Perri, A. Di Castelnuovo, L. Iacoviello, G. De Gaetano, F. Violi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and aims: Previous meta-analyses of interventional trials with vitamin E provided negative results but it remains unclear if this vitamin has some influence on cardiovascular events when supplemented alone. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of vitamin E alone or in combination with other antioxidants on myocardial infarction. Methods and results: Pubmed, ISI Web of Science, SCOPUS and Cochrane database were searched without language restrictions. We investigated randomized clinical trials studying the effect of vitamin E supplementation on myocardial infarction. Sixteen randomized controlled trials of vitamin E treatment were analyzed in this meta-analysis. The dose range for vitamin E was 33-800. IU. Follow-up ranged from 0.5 to 9.4 years. Compared to controls, vitamin E given alone significantly decreased myocardial infarction (3.0% vs 3.4%) (random effects R.R.: 0.82; 95% C.I., 0.70-0.96; p=0.01). This effect was driven by reduction of fatal myocardial infarction (random effects R.R.: 0.84; 95% C.I., 0.73-0.96; p=0.01). Conclusions: When supplemented alone, vitamin E reduces myocardial infarction in interventional trials while it appears ineffective when associated with other antioxidants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-363
Number of pages10
JournalNutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiovascular events
  • Myocardial infarction
  • RCTs
  • ROS
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Supplementation with vitamin E alone is associated with reduced myocardial infarction: A meta-analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this