Supportive care services in hemato-oncology centers: a national survey

Sebastiano Mercadante, Andrea Costanzi, Fabrizio David, Patrizia Villari, Maurizio Musso, Paolo Marchetti, Alessandra Casuccio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: In the field of hemato-oncology, there is paucity of data assessing models of integration between hemato-oncology and other partner specialties. The aim of this national survey was to gather information about the status of the integration of this kind of activity in hemato-oncologic units existing in Italy. Methods: A national telephone survey was conducted to gather information about the status of the integration of hemato-oncologic and supportive care/anesthesiological services. From the national registry of hemato-oncology units, 149 centers were contacted by phone and a dedicated doctor was identified to gather information about the center through a telephone interview. Results: Eighty-one centers (54.3 %) agreed to participate. A mean of 206 (SD 132) painful procedures/year/center were performed. No significant differences among regions and centers were found (P = 0.680). Of the centers, 41.9 % usually asked for anesthesiological consultation to perform painful procedures. No differences were found between the regions (P = 0.137). A mean of 1.8 (SD 1.2) days elapsed from the request to the procedure performance (P = 0.271). No differences among the regions were found (P = 0.350). A mean of 220 (SD 89) central venous vascular accesses/year/center were performed. No differences among regions were found (P = 0.170). No differences among the centers were found (P = 0.691). A mean of 1.8 (SD 1.2) days elapsed from the request to the performance of procedure. Of the centers, 64.2 % had a palliative care team. No differences among regions were found (P = 0.331). A mean of 31.5 (SD 12.2) consultations/year/center for pain control were required. No differences among the regions were found (P = 0.556). Of the centers, 30.8 % had some beds for palliative care. No differences among the regions were found (P = 0.641). Of the centers, 32 % had a hospice was available. No differences among regions were found (P = 0.298). Conclusion: Integration between hemato-oncology and other professionals is unlikely to be optimal in Italy. Such integration is complex and needs great efforts to solve several organizational problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - May 25 2016

Keywords

  • Hematological malignancy
  • Painful procedures
  • Palliative care
  • Sedation
  • Supportive care
  • Venous access

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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