Supramodal effects of covert spatial orienting triggered by visual or tactile events

E. Macaluso, C. D. Frith, J. Driver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify brain areas involved in spatial attention and determine whether these operate unimodaily or supramodally for vision and touch. On a trial-by-trial basis, a symbolic auditory cue indicated the most likely side for the subsequent target, thus directing covert attention to one side. A subsequent target appeared in vision or touch on the cued or uncued side. Invalidly cued trials (as compared with valid trials) activated the temporo-parietal junction and regions of inferior frontal cortex, regardless of target modality. These brain areas have been associated with multimodal spatial coding in physiological studies of the monkey brain and were linked to a change in the location that must be attended to in the present study. The intraparietal sulcus and superior frontal cortex were also activated in our task, again, regardless of target modality, but did not show any specificity for invalidly cued trials. These results identify a supramodal network for spatial attention and reveal differential activity for inferior circuits involving the temporo-parietal junction and inferior frontal cortex (specific to invalid trials) versus more superior intraparietal-frontal circuits (common to valid and invalid trials).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)389-401
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2002

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Touch
Frontal Lobe
Parietal Lobe
Brain
Haplorhini
Cues
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Supramodal effects of covert spatial orienting triggered by visual or tactile events. / Macaluso, E.; Frith, C. D.; Driver, J.

In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.04.2002, p. 389-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Macaluso, E. ; Frith, C. D. ; Driver, J. / Supramodal effects of covert spatial orienting triggered by visual or tactile events. In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 2002 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 389-401.
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