Surface chemistry effects of topographic modification of titanium dental implant surfaces: 2. In vitro experiments

Clara Cassinelli, Marco Morra, Giuseppe Bruzzone, Angelo Carpi, Giuseppe Di Santi, Roberto Giardino, Milena Fini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To determine, in vitro, cytotoxicity and cell adhesion on 3 different implant surfaces. Materials and Methods: All samples had machined surfaces, but they were subjected to different cleaning procedures, which produced 3 different surface chemistries. One of the samples was "as-produced" from the machining tools. The other samples were subjected to partial and total cleaning routines. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using mouse fibroblast cultures, and cell adhesion was evaluated with osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells. Results: The "as-produced" sample showed a pronounced surface contamination by lubricating oils. For partially and totally cleaned samples, an increasing amount of titanium and a decreasing carbon/titanium ratio was observed as cleaning became more complete. Discussion: Differences in surface chemistry such as those normally found on titanium implant surfaces (see part i of this series) can lead to those same effects which, in in vitro experiments, are normally accounted for in terms of surface topography alone. Conclusion: Effects related to surface chemistry can operate over and above surface topography, making it impossible, without proper characterization, to make definite statements about the role of topography alone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-52
Number of pages7
JournalThe International journal of oral & maxillofacial implants
Volume18
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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Dental Implants
Titanium
Cell Adhesion
Osteoblasts
Oils
Carbon
Fibroblasts
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Cell adhesion
  • Cytotoxicity
  • Dental implants
  • Surface properties
  • Surface topography
  • Titanium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Surface chemistry effects of topographic modification of titanium dental implant surfaces : 2. In vitro experiments. / Cassinelli, Clara; Morra, Marco; Bruzzone, Giuseppe; Carpi, Angelo; Di Santi, Giuseppe; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena.

In: The International journal of oral & maxillofacial implants, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2003, p. 46-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cassinelli, Clara ; Morra, Marco ; Bruzzone, Giuseppe ; Carpi, Angelo ; Di Santi, Giuseppe ; Giardino, Roberto ; Fini, Milena. / Surface chemistry effects of topographic modification of titanium dental implant surfaces : 2. In vitro experiments. In: The International journal of oral & maxillofacial implants. 2003 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 46-52.
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AU - Giardino, Roberto

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