Surgical gastrointestinal anomalies including diaphragmatic hernia: Does type of anomaly affect neurodevelopmental outcome?

Francesca Bevilacqua, Francesco Morini, Laura Valfrè, Lucilla Ravà, Annabella Braguglia, Antonio Zaccara, Pietro Bagolan, Lucia Aite

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To describe short-term neurodevelopmental outcome of infants operated on for congenital anomalies (CA) and assess the impact of type of CA on the outcome. Study Design: From 2008 to 2010 newborns operated on for CA were enrolled in a cross-sectional follow-up study including three distinct groups: infants of 6 months (group A), infants of 12 months (group B), and children of 24 months (group C). Each group was divided into five subgroups: (1) esophageal atresia; (2) congenital diaphragmatic hernia; (3) midgut malformations; (4) abdominal wall defects; (5) colorectal malformations. Each group of patients underwent a neurodevelopmental evaluation with Bayley III. Results: In all, 150, 156, and 84 babies were enrolled in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Mean (standard deviation) Mental Scale score was 94.65 (8.75), 98.76 (11.03), and 100.60 (12.04) in groups A, B, and C. Mean (standard deviation) Motor Scale score was 96.89 (11.62), 99.23 (14.83), and 103.60 (12.90) in groups A, B, and C. No significant differences were found among the five subgroups considered. Conclusion: Regardless of type of malformation, short-term neurodevelopmental outcome of children with gastrointestinal anomalies including diaphragmatic hernia falls within normal range, suggesting that neither being born with a CA nor its type is per se a risk factor for neurodevelopmental delay.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-179
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Perinatology
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

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Diaphragmatic Hernia
Esophageal Atresia
Abdominal Wall
Reference Values
Newborn Infant

Keywords

  • follow-up study
  • major congenital malformations
  • neurodevelopmental outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

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title = "Surgical gastrointestinal anomalies including diaphragmatic hernia: Does type of anomaly affect neurodevelopmental outcome?",
abstract = "Objective: To describe short-term neurodevelopmental outcome of infants operated on for congenital anomalies (CA) and assess the impact of type of CA on the outcome. Study Design: From 2008 to 2010 newborns operated on for CA were enrolled in a cross-sectional follow-up study including three distinct groups: infants of 6 months (group A), infants of 12 months (group B), and children of 24 months (group C). Each group was divided into five subgroups: (1) esophageal atresia; (2) congenital diaphragmatic hernia; (3) midgut malformations; (4) abdominal wall defects; (5) colorectal malformations. Each group of patients underwent a neurodevelopmental evaluation with Bayley III. Results: In all, 150, 156, and 84 babies were enrolled in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Mean (standard deviation) Mental Scale score was 94.65 (8.75), 98.76 (11.03), and 100.60 (12.04) in groups A, B, and C. Mean (standard deviation) Motor Scale score was 96.89 (11.62), 99.23 (14.83), and 103.60 (12.90) in groups A, B, and C. No significant differences were found among the five subgroups considered. Conclusion: Regardless of type of malformation, short-term neurodevelopmental outcome of children with gastrointestinal anomalies including diaphragmatic hernia falls within normal range, suggesting that neither being born with a CA nor its type is per se a risk factor for neurodevelopmental delay.",
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T1 - Surgical gastrointestinal anomalies including diaphragmatic hernia

T2 - Does type of anomaly affect neurodevelopmental outcome?

AU - Bevilacqua, Francesca

AU - Morini, Francesco

AU - Valfrè, Laura

AU - Ravà, Lucilla

AU - Braguglia, Annabella

AU - Zaccara, Antonio

AU - Bagolan, Pietro

AU - Aite, Lucia

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N2 - Objective: To describe short-term neurodevelopmental outcome of infants operated on for congenital anomalies (CA) and assess the impact of type of CA on the outcome. Study Design: From 2008 to 2010 newborns operated on for CA were enrolled in a cross-sectional follow-up study including three distinct groups: infants of 6 months (group A), infants of 12 months (group B), and children of 24 months (group C). Each group was divided into five subgroups: (1) esophageal atresia; (2) congenital diaphragmatic hernia; (3) midgut malformations; (4) abdominal wall defects; (5) colorectal malformations. Each group of patients underwent a neurodevelopmental evaluation with Bayley III. Results: In all, 150, 156, and 84 babies were enrolled in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Mean (standard deviation) Mental Scale score was 94.65 (8.75), 98.76 (11.03), and 100.60 (12.04) in groups A, B, and C. Mean (standard deviation) Motor Scale score was 96.89 (11.62), 99.23 (14.83), and 103.60 (12.90) in groups A, B, and C. No significant differences were found among the five subgroups considered. Conclusion: Regardless of type of malformation, short-term neurodevelopmental outcome of children with gastrointestinal anomalies including diaphragmatic hernia falls within normal range, suggesting that neither being born with a CA nor its type is per se a risk factor for neurodevelopmental delay.

AB - Objective: To describe short-term neurodevelopmental outcome of infants operated on for congenital anomalies (CA) and assess the impact of type of CA on the outcome. Study Design: From 2008 to 2010 newborns operated on for CA were enrolled in a cross-sectional follow-up study including three distinct groups: infants of 6 months (group A), infants of 12 months (group B), and children of 24 months (group C). Each group was divided into five subgroups: (1) esophageal atresia; (2) congenital diaphragmatic hernia; (3) midgut malformations; (4) abdominal wall defects; (5) colorectal malformations. Each group of patients underwent a neurodevelopmental evaluation with Bayley III. Results: In all, 150, 156, and 84 babies were enrolled in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Mean (standard deviation) Mental Scale score was 94.65 (8.75), 98.76 (11.03), and 100.60 (12.04) in groups A, B, and C. Mean (standard deviation) Motor Scale score was 96.89 (11.62), 99.23 (14.83), and 103.60 (12.90) in groups A, B, and C. No significant differences were found among the five subgroups considered. Conclusion: Regardless of type of malformation, short-term neurodevelopmental outcome of children with gastrointestinal anomalies including diaphragmatic hernia falls within normal range, suggesting that neither being born with a CA nor its type is per se a risk factor for neurodevelopmental delay.

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