Surgical outcome for robotic-assisted single-site hysterectomy (RSSH) in female-to male reassignment compared to its use in benign gynecological disease: a single center experience

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Abstract

This study was oriented to assess surgical outcomes, feasibility, and safety of Robotic-assisted Single-Site Hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (RSSH/BSO) performed for sexual reassignment compared to indications for the benign gynecologic disease. The present trial is a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database. After the exclusion of 3 patients with endometrial cancer on histological specimens, 112 subjects were considered for final analysis: 60 transgender men (TM) and 52 cisgender women (CW). There is a statistical difference in surgical time (total operative time p = 0.0152, docking p = 0.0011, console time p = 0.0001, and anesthesia time p = 0.0061) between TM and CW. Other than in TM, a significant difference in uterine volume (p = 0.0001), Body Mass Index (p = 0.0169), and previous comorbidity (p = 0.0001) was reported. There are no differences in conversion rate, the decrease in hemoglobin and blood loss, hospital stay, intra- and postoperative complications between the two groups. RSSH for sex reassignment appears to be a safe, viable, and cost-effective option with a significant decrease in surgical time compared to other indications for benign disease. In addition, the benefit of this scar-less surgical procedure appears to be more evident in TM’s due to the absence of traditional surgical stigmata.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Robotic Surgery
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Female-to-male reassignment
  • Robotic surgery
  • Single site
  • Transsexuals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Health Informatics

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