Surgical Treatment of Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma

Elio Campagnutta, Giorgio Giorda, Giovanni De Piero, Francesco Sopracordevole, M. Caterina Visentin, Luca Martella, Carlo Scarabelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Surgery does not have a definite role in the treatment of patients with recurrent endometrial carcinoma, except for those with central pelvic recurrences. The authors describe their experience with surgery in patients with abdominal endometrial recurrences. METHODS. Between 1988 and 2000, 75 patients with abdominal and pelvic endometrial recurrences underwent secondary rescue surgery. Patients were classified according to the presence or absence of residual tumor after surgery. Therapy after rescue surgery was undertaken at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The progression-free interval and overall survival were defined as the time from secondary rescue surgery to the specific event and were evaluated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to compare survival with covariates. RESULTS. Fifty-six patients (74.7%) underwent optimal debulking. Major surgical complications were observed in 23 patients (30.7%). Only 1 postoperative death was observed, although the mortality rate for surgical complications after the postoperative period was 8%. Patients who underwent optimal debulking had a significantly better cumulative survival rate compared with patients who had residual disease (36% vs. 0% at 60 months; P <0.05). Residual disease, chemotherapy after rescue surgery, and central pelvis-vagina as the only site of recurrence were associated significantly with survival. CONCLUSIONS. The authors found that this approach was very challenging in terms of the procedures involved, the incidence of major surgical complications, and the high mortality rate. It was useful in increasing overall survival, provided that patients were free of macroscopic disease. Careful selection of patients is needed to minimize mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-96
Number of pages8
JournalCancer
Volume100
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Endometrial Neoplasms
Recurrence
Therapeutics
Survival
Mortality
Residual Neoplasm
Vagina
Pelvis
Proportional Hazards Models
Postoperative Period
Patient Selection
Survival Rate
Drug Therapy
Incidence

Keywords

  • Endometrial neoplasms
  • Recurrence
  • Salvage therapy
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Campagnutta, E., Giorda, G., De Piero, G., Sopracordevole, F., Visentin, M. C., Martella, L., & Scarabelli, C. (2004). Surgical Treatment of Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma. Cancer, 100(1), 89-96. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11868

Surgical Treatment of Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma. / Campagnutta, Elio; Giorda, Giorgio; De Piero, Giovanni; Sopracordevole, Francesco; Visentin, M. Caterina; Martella, Luca; Scarabelli, Carlo.

In: Cancer, Vol. 100, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 89-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Campagnutta, E, Giorda, G, De Piero, G, Sopracordevole, F, Visentin, MC, Martella, L & Scarabelli, C 2004, 'Surgical Treatment of Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma', Cancer, vol. 100, no. 1, pp. 89-96. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11868
Campagnutta E, Giorda G, De Piero G, Sopracordevole F, Visentin MC, Martella L et al. Surgical Treatment of Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma. Cancer. 2004 Jan 1;100(1):89-96. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11868
Campagnutta, Elio ; Giorda, Giorgio ; De Piero, Giovanni ; Sopracordevole, Francesco ; Visentin, M. Caterina ; Martella, Luca ; Scarabelli, Carlo. / Surgical Treatment of Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma. In: Cancer. 2004 ; Vol. 100, No. 1. pp. 89-96.
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