Survey Definitions of Gout for Epidemiologic Studies: Comparison With Crystal Identification as the Gold Standard

Nicola Dalbeth, H. Ralph Schumacher, Jaap Fransen, Tuhina Neogi, Tim L. Jansen, Melanie Brown, Worawit Louthrenoo, Janitzia Vazquez-Mellado, Maxim Eliseev, Geraldine McCarthy, Lisa K. Stamp, Fernando Perez-Ruiz, Francisca Sivera, Hang Korng Ea, Martijn Gerritsen, Carlo A. Scire, Lorenzo Cavagna, Chingtsai Lin, Yin Yi Chou, Anne Kathrin TauscheGeraldo da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Matthijs Janssen, Jiunn Horng Chen, Marco A. Cimmino, Till Uhlig, William J. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To identify the best-performing survey definition of gout from items commonly available in epidemiologic studies. Methods: Survey definitions of gout were identified from 34 epidemiologic studies contributing to the Global Urate Genetics Consortium (GUGC) genome-wide association study. Data from the Study for Updated Gout Classification Criteria (SUGAR) were randomly divided into development and test data sets. A data-driven case definition was formed using logistic regression in the development data set. This definition, along with definitions used in GUGC studies and the 2015 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) gout classification criteria were applied to the test data set, using monosodium urate crystal identification as the gold standard. Results: For all tested GUGC definitions, the simple definition of “self-report of gout or urate-lowering therapy use” had the best test performance characteristics (sensitivity 82%, specificity 72%). The simple definition had similar performance to a SUGAR data-driven case definition with 5 weighted items: self-report, self-report of doctor diagnosis, colchicine use, urate-lowering therapy use, and hyperuricemia (sensitivity 87%, specificity 70%). Both of these definitions performed better than the 1977 American Rheumatism Association survey criteria (sensitivity 82%, specificity 67%). Of all tested definitions, the 2015 ACR/EULAR criteria had the best performance (sensitivity 92%, specificity 89%). Conclusion: A simple definition of “self-report of gout or urate-lowering therapy use” has the best test performance characteristics of existing definitions that use routinely available data. A more complex combination of features is more sensitive, but still lacks good specificity. If a more accurate case definition is required for a particular study, the 2015 ACR/EULAR gout classification criteria should be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1894-1898
Number of pages5
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume68
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2016

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Gout
Uric Acid
Epidemiologic Studies
Self Report
Rheumatic Diseases
Sensitivity and Specificity
Rheumatology
Hyperuricemia
Genome-Wide Association Study
Colchicine
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics
Logistic Models
Datasets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Dalbeth, N., Schumacher, H. R., Fransen, J., Neogi, T., Jansen, T. L., Brown, M., ... Taylor, W. J. (2016). Survey Definitions of Gout for Epidemiologic Studies: Comparison With Crystal Identification as the Gold Standard. Arthritis Care and Research, 68(12), 1894-1898. https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.22896

Survey Definitions of Gout for Epidemiologic Studies : Comparison With Crystal Identification as the Gold Standard. / Dalbeth, Nicola; Schumacher, H. Ralph; Fransen, Jaap; Neogi, Tuhina; Jansen, Tim L.; Brown, Melanie; Louthrenoo, Worawit; Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Eliseev, Maxim; McCarthy, Geraldine; Stamp, Lisa K.; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Sivera, Francisca; Ea, Hang Korng; Gerritsen, Martijn; Scire, Carlo A.; Cavagna, Lorenzo; Lin, Chingtsai; Chou, Yin Yi; Tausche, Anne Kathrin; da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Geraldo; Janssen, Matthijs; Chen, Jiunn Horng; Cimmino, Marco A.; Uhlig, Till; Taylor, William J.

In: Arthritis Care and Research, Vol. 68, No. 12, 01.12.2016, p. 1894-1898.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dalbeth, N, Schumacher, HR, Fransen, J, Neogi, T, Jansen, TL, Brown, M, Louthrenoo, W, Vazquez-Mellado, J, Eliseev, M, McCarthy, G, Stamp, LK, Perez-Ruiz, F, Sivera, F, Ea, HK, Gerritsen, M, Scire, CA, Cavagna, L, Lin, C, Chou, YY, Tausche, AK, da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, G, Janssen, M, Chen, JH, Cimmino, MA, Uhlig, T & Taylor, WJ 2016, 'Survey Definitions of Gout for Epidemiologic Studies: Comparison With Crystal Identification as the Gold Standard', Arthritis Care and Research, vol. 68, no. 12, pp. 1894-1898. https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.22896
Dalbeth, Nicola ; Schumacher, H. Ralph ; Fransen, Jaap ; Neogi, Tuhina ; Jansen, Tim L. ; Brown, Melanie ; Louthrenoo, Worawit ; Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia ; Eliseev, Maxim ; McCarthy, Geraldine ; Stamp, Lisa K. ; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando ; Sivera, Francisca ; Ea, Hang Korng ; Gerritsen, Martijn ; Scire, Carlo A. ; Cavagna, Lorenzo ; Lin, Chingtsai ; Chou, Yin Yi ; Tausche, Anne Kathrin ; da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Geraldo ; Janssen, Matthijs ; Chen, Jiunn Horng ; Cimmino, Marco A. ; Uhlig, Till ; Taylor, William J. / Survey Definitions of Gout for Epidemiologic Studies : Comparison With Crystal Identification as the Gold Standard. In: Arthritis Care and Research. 2016 ; Vol. 68, No. 12. pp. 1894-1898.
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AU - Louthrenoo, Worawit

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