Survival from acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia (ANLL) and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in European children since 1978: A population-based study

G. Gatta, R. Luksch, M. P. Coleman, I. Corazziari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We used data supplied by population-based cancer registries, collected and quality controlled using a common protocol, to analyse survival from acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia (ANLL) and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) among children in 17 European countries. Variations in survival in relation to age, country, histologic subtype and period of diagnosis (1978-1992) were examined. These are rare malignancies and survival can be studied reliably only by examination of data from a very large population in this case (EUROCARE). 5 years after diagnosis, overall survival was 44% (95% CI 33-55) for CML and 37% (95% CI 32-43) for ANLL. For both types of leukaemia, survival was slightly better for girls and worse in children under 5 years of age. Consistent with clinical literature, the ANLL subtypes with poorer prognosis were monocytic, megakaryocytic and erythroleukaemia. For ANLL, 5-year survival was better in Finland, the UK, The Netherlands and Germany (≥40%); for CML, 5-year survival was highest in Italy, although the 95% CI were wide. The risk of death from ANLL and CML fell by 7% per year and 5% per year, respectively, after adjustment for age, gender and country. Since these rare childhood malignancies were virtually untreatable until 1970, these are very welcome trends.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)695-702
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia
  • Childhood cancer
  • Chronic myeloid leukaemia
  • Europe
  • Gender contrast
  • Population-based cancer registries
  • Survival
  • Survival trends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

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