Survivorship of bipolar fresh total osteochondral ankle allograft

Sandro Giannini, Roberto Buda, Gherardo Pagliazzi, Alberto Ruffilli, Marco Cavallo, Matteo Baldassarri, Francesca Vannini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Severe posttraumatic ankle arthritis poses a reconstructive challenge in the young and active patient. Bipolar fresh total osteochondral allograft (BFTOA) may represent an intriguing alternative to arthrodesis and prosthetic replacement. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the outcomes of BFTOA performed through an anterior approach to the ankle and to investigate the parameters influencing the results. Methods: A total of 26 patients (18 males and 8 females with a mean age of 34.9 ± 7.7 years) underwent BFTOA. The allograft was prepared with the help of specifically designed jigs and the surgery was performed using a direct anterior approach. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months after the operation, and at a mean 40.9 ± 14.1 months of follow-up. Radiographic evaluation included the measurement of allograft size matching and alignment. Results: The AOFAS score improved from 26.6 ± 6 preoperatively to 77.8 ± 8.7 after a mean follow-up of 40.9 ± 14.1 months (P <.0005). Six failures occurred. Joint degeneration was classified as 2 in 12 and as 3 in 14 patients. A statistically significant correlation between low degrees of distal tibial slope and better clinical outcomes was observed (P = .049). Conclusion: BFTOA appears to be a viable option to arthrodesis or arthroplasty. Precise allograft sizing, stable fitting, and fixation and delayed weight-bearing were key factors for a successful outcome. In this series the correct alignment of the tibial graft, in terms of slope, was found to play a crucial role in the allograft survivorship. Level of Evidence: Level IV, case series.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-251
Number of pages9
JournalFoot and Ankle International
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Ankle
Allografts
Survival Rate
Arthrodesis
Weight-Bearing
Arthroplasty
Arthritis
Joints
Transplants

Keywords

  • arthritis
  • biomechanics
  • gait studies
  • outcome studies
  • trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Survivorship of bipolar fresh total osteochondral ankle allograft. / Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Baldassarri, Matteo; Vannini, Francesca.

In: Foot and Ankle International, Vol. 35, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 243-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Giannini, Sandro ; Buda, Roberto ; Pagliazzi, Gherardo ; Ruffilli, Alberto ; Cavallo, Marco ; Baldassarri, Matteo ; Vannini, Francesca. / Survivorship of bipolar fresh total osteochondral ankle allograft. In: Foot and Ankle International. 2014 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 243-251.
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